biotin


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biotin

 [bi´o-tin]
a sulfur-containing member of the vitamin B complex that plays an essential role in gluconeogenesis and the synthesis of fatty acids. Food sources include liver, egg yolk, soy flour, cereals, and yeast. For recommended daily intake, see Section 4 of the appendices. See also vitamin.

bi·o·tin

(bī'ō-tin),
The d-isomer component of the vitamin B2 complex occurring in or required by most organisms and inactivated by avidin; participates in biologic carboxylations. It is a small molecule with a high affinity for avidin that can be readily coupled to a previously labeled antibody to allow visualization by enzymatic or histochemical means.
See also: avidin.

biotin

/bio·tin/ (bi´o-tin) a member of the vitamin B complex; it is a cofactor for several enzymes, plays a role in fatty acid and amino acid metabolism, and is used in vitro in some biochemical assays.

biotin

(bī′ə-tĭn)
n.
A vitamin, C10H16N2O3S, that is a component of the vitamin B complex and is a cofactor in many enzyme systems. It is found in large quantities in liver, egg yolk, milk, and yeast and is used in many biotechnology applications.

biotin

[bī′ətin]
Etymology: Gk, bios, life
a colorless, crystalline, water-soluble B complex vitamin that acts as a coenzyme in fatty acid production and in the oxidation of fatty acids and carbohydrates. It also aids in the use of protein, folic acid, pantothenic acid, and vitamin B12. Rich sources are egg yolk, beef liver, kidney, unpolished rice, brewer's yeast, peanuts, cauliflower, and mushrooms. Formerly called vitamin H. See also avidin.

biotin

A water-soluble B vitamin.

Biochemistry
Biotin is the d-isomer of vitamin-B2 complex, which is a prosthetic group for carboxylase enzymes and important in fatty acid biosynthesis and catabolism. It is present in and essential for most animals, as it participates in carboxylation; daily requirements are in the mg range; biotin deficiency is rare.
 
Lab medicine
Biotin is widely used as a covalent label for macromolecules which are detected by high-affinity binding of labelled avidin or streptavidin.

Molecular biology
Biotin can be incorporated into dUTP and used as a non-radioactive label for a DNA probe. It is used to label nucleic acids and proteins that may be subsequently detected by avidin or streptavidin linked to a fluorescent or enzymatic reporter molecule.

bi·o·tin

(bī'ō-tin)
The d-isomer component of the vitamin B2 complex occurring in or required by most organisms and inactivated by avidin; participates in biologic carboxylations.

biotin

A water-soluble B vitamin concerned in the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. Deficiency causes DERMATITIS, muscle pain, loss of appetite and ANAEMIA.

biotin

a water-soluble vitamin of the B-COMPLEX present in many foods, including yeast, liver and fresh vegetables. Biotin acts as a COENZYME in amino acid and lipid METABOLISM. A deficiency (rare in humans) of biotin causes dermatitis and intestinal problems.

biotin

a component of vitamin B2 complex

biotin (bīˑ··tn),

n a B vitamin synthesized by bacteria within the gut; acts as a cofactor with enzymes; thought useful in the treatment of diabetes and brittle nails. Supplementation is not usually necessary except with pregnancy, inflammatory bowel disease, or antibiotic or anticon-vulsant medications. No known precautions.

bi·o·tin

(bī'ō-tin)
The d-isomer component of the vitamin B2 complex occurring in or required by most organisms and inactivated by avidin.
See also: avidin

biotin (bī´ətin),

biotin

a member of the vitamin B complex, required by or occurring in all forms of life tested; prosthetic group of carboxylase enzymes. Called also vitamin H, coenzyme R.

biotin nutritional deficiency
natural animal diets are unlikely to be deficient in biotin. Experimental deficiency causes paralysis in calves. In pigs the syndrome includes alopecia, dermatitis and cracking of the hooves. The vitamin may be an important factor in the maintenance of pig hoof health. See also porcine footrot. Deficiency in dogs and cats is associated with dry scurfy skin, alopecia, especially around the eyes, and a papulocrustaceous dermatitis. It can be caused by a diet with very high levels of uncooked egg whites. See also avidin.
References in periodicals archive ?
This supplement from Life Glow Products contains 5000 mcg of biotin for high potency.
The evidence for nails that proponents typically cite, for example, comes from a small, flawed study conducted more than 25 years ago by a European biotin manufacturer.
The bottom line: The biotin in multivitamins is unlikely to do anything for your hair, skin, or nails.
Triplicate independent reactions were carried out for each of the samples on the Ovation Biotin System.
When a biotin detection system was used, nonspecific staining was seen regularly in oxyphilic cells in lymphocytic thyroiditis.
Comment: Chromium and biotin have each been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with diabetes.
There's no evidence that taking extra biotin means that you'll break down fats or protein better or quicker.
In their first application of the method, researchers used the MPS-PPV-quenching scheme to detect a protein--called avidin because it avidly binds the vitamin biotin.
RDA of thiamine, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, iodine, zinc and vitamins A, C and B6; 25 percent U.
The probes are available with three different labels, Cy3, FITC and Biotin.
5 mg of biotin, as well as other vitamins and minerals that nourish a healthy appearance from the inside out.