biotechnology


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Related to biotechnology: genetic engineering

bi·o·tech·nol·og·y

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ō-jē),
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules, or for the alteration of biologic processes to enhance some desired property.

biotechnology

(bī′ō-tĕk-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The use of living organisms or biological processes for the purpose of developing useful agricultural, industrial, or medical products, especially by means of techniques, such as genetic engineering, that involve the modification of genes.
2. See ergonomics.

bi′o·tech′ni·cal (-nĭ-kəl) adj.
bi′o·tech′no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.

biotechnology

[-teknol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + techne, art, logos, science
1 the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery, such as the health effects of computer equipment on office workers or the ability of airplane pilots to perform tasks when traveling at supersonic speeds.
2 the industrial application of the results of biological research, particularly in fields such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) or gene splicing, which permits the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes by combining genetic material from different species. See also recombinant DNA.

biotechnology

Any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use.

Biotech tools
Recombinant DNA, monoclonal antibody and bioprocessing techniques, cell fusion.
 
Biotech products
Antibiotics, insulin, interferons, recombinant DNA, and techniques (e.g., waste recycling).
 
Ancient forms of biotechnology
Production of bread, cheese, wine, beer.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules.

biotechnology

The use of micro-organisms or biological processes for commercial, medical or social purposes. The earliest known examples of biotechnology are the fermentation of wines and the making of cheese.

biotechnology

the use of organisms, their parts or processes, for the manufacture or production of useful or commercial substances and for the provision of services such as waste treatment. The term denotes a wide range of processes, from the use of earthworms as a source of protein, to the genetic manipulation of bacteria to produce human gene products such as growth hormone.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
Field devoted to applying techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.

biotechnology,

n 1. the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery.
n 2. the industrial application of the results of biologic research such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and gene splicing that permit the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes.

biotechnology

the application for industrial purposes of scientific, biological principles. The most modern examples are the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering to manufacture a wide variety of biologically useful substances such as vaccines and hormones by expression of cloned genes in various host cell systems including bacteria, yeast and insect cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
White Biotechnology in Bio fuels Industry: Revenue Forecasts (World), 2010-2020 95
The Biotechnology Council of New Jersey (BCNJ) has presented Gualberto "Gil" Medina, director of the technology enterprise group at Cushman & Wakefield of New Jersey, Inc.
Biotechnology customers often ask advice of many opinion leaders and decide what direction they will take after carefully considering the different views.
Eventually COC is hoping to have a biotechnology center, where they could offer tours and education to high school kids.
Ministry of Enterprise Opportunity and Innovation granted $200,000 in the first phase of a $30-million province-wide biotechnology Innovation Program (BCIP) to Northern Ontario, with the purpose of investigating the potential and current activities in the biotechnology sector.
The biotechnology program at Weyerhaeuser has always been driven by the goal of producing clonal seedlings at a cost competitive with orchard seedlings.
Note: The Council for Biotechnology Information commissioned the Roper survey to gauge consumer interest in new biotechnology developments.
Harrigan said that so far interest in the program is strong, even though students will not begin biotechnology course work until next year.
Working with biotechnology start-up companies, as well as biotechnology units of major multinational pharmaceutical companies, Ruder Film has implemented many successful campaigns for promoting pharmaceutical, agricultural and food stock technologies.
BIO represents more than 1,100 biotechnology companies, academic institutions, state biotechnology centers and related organizations across the United States and 31 other nations.
It would have been nice to kick-start the development in the way we wanted to, but it does not mean (the biotechnology cluster for the northwest) is not going to work," Eccles, technology transfer officer at Lakehead University says.

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