biotechnology

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Related to biotechnologists: biotechnical, biotech engineering

bi·o·tech·nol·og·y

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ō-jē),
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules, or for the alteration of biologic processes to enhance some desired property.

biotechnology

(bī′ō-tĕk-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The use of living organisms or biological processes for the purpose of developing useful agricultural, industrial, or medical products, especially by means of techniques, such as genetic engineering, that involve the modification of genes.
2. See ergonomics.

bi′o·tech′ni·cal (-nĭ-kəl) adj.
bi′o·tech′no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.

biotechnology

[-teknol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + techne, art, logos, science
1 the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery, such as the health effects of computer equipment on office workers or the ability of airplane pilots to perform tasks when traveling at supersonic speeds.
2 the industrial application of the results of biological research, particularly in fields such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) or gene splicing, which permits the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes by combining genetic material from different species. See also recombinant DNA.

biotechnology

Any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use.

Biotech tools
Recombinant DNA, monoclonal antibody and bioprocessing techniques, cell fusion.
 
Biotech products
Antibiotics, insulin, interferons, recombinant DNA, and techniques (e.g., waste recycling).
 
Ancient forms of biotechnology
Production of bread, cheese, wine, beer.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules.

biotechnology

The use of micro-organisms or biological processes for commercial, medical or social purposes. The earliest known examples of biotechnology are the fermentation of wines and the making of cheese.

biotechnology

the use of organisms, their parts or processes, for the manufacture or production of useful or commercial substances and for the provision of services such as waste treatment. The term denotes a wide range of processes, from the use of earthworms as a source of protein, to the genetic manipulation of bacteria to produce human gene products such as growth hormone.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
Field devoted to applying techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.

biotechnology,

n 1. the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery.
n 2. the industrial application of the results of biologic research such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and gene splicing that permit the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes.

biotechnology

the application for industrial purposes of scientific, biological principles. The most modern examples are the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering to manufacture a wide variety of biologically useful substances such as vaccines and hormones by expression of cloned genes in various host cell systems including bacteria, yeast and insect cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
In another approach, biotechnologists are studying baculoviruses, a large variety of viruses composed of double strands of DNA that act specifically on hundreds of arthropods, including many agricultural pests, but appear to be safe for plants and vertebrates.
The premise of this dubious argument: because the DNA of the cloned embryo and patient will be almost identical, once biotechnologists learn to make cloned embryos of patients, the clones can be destroyed for their cells and tissues for use in medical treatments without worrying about rejection.
For today's biotechnologists, geneticists and molecular biologists, the established order has given way to limitless possibility for creativity.
The sorts of constructions biotechnologists are now experimenting with, or that Catts and Zur are reproducing as art, are the once inconceivable entities -- organic yet human-made hybrids.
Aquasearch is a Charter Member of the Marine Bioproducts Engineering Center, a $26 million, five-year R&D effort dedicated to the commercialization of products from marine microorganisms, including microalgae, and to the education and training of a new generation of marine biotechnologists.
Biotechnologists are rapidly uncovering the causes of and developing effective treatments for the afflictions of old age - heart disease, cancer, stroke, and dementia.
He said last year's popular booths were those featuring medical professionals, including physical therapists, dentists and biotechnologists.
Biotechnologists are mounting a major effort to persuade reluctant Britons that they can learn to love genetically-engineered "Frankenstein food".
As we face the 21st century, biotechnologists have deemed certain whole animals and parts of animals "man-made inventions.
Biotechnologists, environmental engineers, and resource economists may have all the science they need to exploit the atomistic elements of nature and allocate the products efficiently.
In all, the book provides a wealth of information and insights into this rapidly progressing field for chemists and biotechnologists.
This e-book is a valuable reference for pharmacologists, medicinal chemists, drug designers, biotechnologists and industry (pharmaceutical and chemical) professionals.

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