biotechnology

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bi·o·tech·nol·og·y

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ō-jē),
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules, or for the alteration of biologic processes to enhance some desired property.

biotechnology

(bī′ō-tĕk-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The use of living organisms or biological processes for the purpose of developing useful agricultural, industrial, or medical products, especially by means of techniques, such as genetic engineering, that involve the modification of genes.
2. See ergonomics.

bi′o·tech′ni·cal (-nĭ-kəl) adj.
bi′o·tech′no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.

biotechnology

[-teknol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + techne, art, logos, science
1 the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery, such as the health effects of computer equipment on office workers or the ability of airplane pilots to perform tasks when traveling at supersonic speeds.
2 the industrial application of the results of biological research, particularly in fields such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) or gene splicing, which permits the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes by combining genetic material from different species. See also recombinant DNA.

biotechnology

Any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use.

Biotech tools
Recombinant DNA, monoclonal antibody and bioprocessing techniques, cell fusion.
 
Biotech products
Antibiotics, insulin, interferons, recombinant DNA, and techniques (e.g., waste recycling).
 
Ancient forms of biotechnology
Production of bread, cheese, wine, beer.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules.

biotechnology

The use of micro-organisms or biological processes for commercial, medical or social purposes. The earliest known examples of biotechnology are the fermentation of wines and the making of cheese.

biotechnology

the use of organisms, their parts or processes, for the manufacture or production of useful or commercial substances and for the provision of services such as waste treatment. The term denotes a wide range of processes, from the use of earthworms as a source of protein, to the genetic manipulation of bacteria to produce human gene products such as growth hormone.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
Field devoted to applying techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.

biotechnology,

n 1. the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery.
n 2. the industrial application of the results of biologic research such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and gene splicing that permit the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes.

biotechnology

the application for industrial purposes of scientific, biological principles. The most modern examples are the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering to manufacture a wide variety of biologically useful substances such as vaccines and hormones by expression of cloned genes in various host cell systems including bacteria, yeast and insect cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reecy: a well known animal biotechnologist for his research in the areas of growth and development in beef cattle genetics and for developing bioinformatics tools to allow livestock researchers complete genomics research in a timely manner.
14=) SIR CHRIS EVANS, BIOTECHNOLOGY, pounds 120M The Eelsh steelworker's son is Britain's leading biotechnologist.
To the tenant farmer and the wealthy landowner, the biotechnologist and the canola breeder, national governments and migrant workers, Jesus offers the same kingdom of abundance and just distribution.
Ideal for Non-Scientists and Scientists needing to understand the basic theory, principles, techniques, and potential of biotechnology Why you should attend - Gain an introduction to the fundamental principles of biotechnology - Improve your understanding of the key techniques used by biotechnologists - Understand the importance of meeting regulatory requirements and hear about the advances being made - Learn how to identify potential patents, and why and how they must be protected - Share knowledge and experiences with fellow attendees from across Europe Who should attend - Quality Assurance - Regulatory Affairs - Legal and IP - Business Development - Sales and Marketing - Engineering - Finance - Finance - Training - Administration - Management For more information visit http://www.
This was highlighted by country's renowned biotechnologists at launching ceremony of ISAAA report (ISAAA Brief 46) on global status of genetically modified (GM) crops.
The intended audience includes botanists and food scientists, policy makers, and conservationists, NGO personnel working in rural areas, and biotechnologists involved in micropropagation.
The conference is the biggest gathering of Iranian and international biotechnologists held biennially.
But biotechnologists are also interested in printing, given the potential it offers for building artificial tissue in layers.
Cultech, which was founded in 1994 by biotechnologists Nigel and Sue Plummer, supplies the likes of Boots in the UK and GNC in the US, as well as to the healthcare practitioner market of GPs and nutritionalists.
About 100 specialists, including chemists, physicists, biotechnologists and biologists will be hired in the expansion.
Thirty five top biotechnologists from seven countries are participating in this high level policy level meeting.
Modern Biopharmaceuticals is an essential reference work for biotechnologists, clinicians, medical doctors, pharmacists, pharmaceutical chemists, bio-chemists, molecular biologists, medicinal chemists, as well as all those working in the biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries, or medicinal institutes.

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