biotech engineering

(redirected from biotechnological engineering)

biotech engineering

(1) The use of living organisms and bioprocesses in engineering, technology, medicine and other fields to manufacture products of biomedical interest.
(2) A general term for civil engineering methods which incorporate organic materials to provide functional and aesthetically pleasing structures for wildlife habitats.
References in periodicals archive ?
The project is coordinated by the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, which will be responsible for developing innovative solutions by embracing collective expertise and synergies between interdisciplinary areas such as database development, scientific visualization methods, statistics, machine learning, mathematical modeling and biotechnological engineering.
It is in this framework that the Universite de Sherbrooke (UdeS) has created a new program called biotechnological engineering.
Universite de Sherbrooke's biotechnological engineering curriculum
In an era of rapid evolution in the biotechnology-based industry, it is imperative that the biotechnological engineering discipline defines its own core.
Biotechnological engineering programs must take into account the complexity of living systems with their discrete and non-linear relationships.
The biotechnological engineering program at the Universite de Sherbrooke was developed by the departments of biology and chemical engineering.
This integrated approach is absolutely essential to consolidate the biotechnological engineering discipline and to eliminate the biology-engineering barrier.
That is why the biotechnological engineering program was developed with industrial partners.
The intellectual core of the biotechnological engineering program at the Universite de Sherbrooke has been defined by keeping in mind that our future engineers must be capable of practising in most of the biotechnology areas.
He is presently the head of the new program of biotechnological engineering.
Biotechnological engineering is leading to `acceptable' modifications in the processing of foodstuffs, dietary supplements, household goods, and textiles.
While these examples employ both traditional crop improvement techniques and biotechnological engineering, they provide some indication of how concerted efforts to engineer crops can contribute to addressing agricultural problems.