biosafety level


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Related to biosafety level: biosafety level 3, biosafety level 4, biosafety level 1

biosafety level

(1) The degree of caution required when working with specific groups of pathogens
(2) A specific combination of work practices, safety equipment, and facilities, intended to minimise exposure of workers and environment to certain classes of pathogens.

Biosafety level 
BL 1—Organisms are relatively innocuous and are not known to cause infection in healthy human adult—e.g., Bacillus subtilis and Naegleria gruberi.
 
BL 21—Organisms are “moderate risk” agents that may cause human disease of varying severity, potentially affecting healthy adults; often good microbiologic technique, such as minimising exposure to aerosols, is a sufficient precaution for these agents—e.g., C difficile, hepatitis A, B and C, influenza A, Lyme disease, dengue fever, Salmonella; mumps, measles, HIV, scrapie, MRSA and VRSA. 

BL 32—Organisms are indigenous or exotic and may infect personnel by aerosols, autoinoculation or ingestion, resulting in potentially serious or lethal consequences—e.g., Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Bacillus anthracis, West Nile virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Eastern equine encephalitis virus, Hendra virus, SARS coronavirus, Salmonella typhi, Coxiella burnetii, Rift Valley fever virus, Rickettsia rickettsii and yellow fever virus.
 
BL 4—Organisms are dangerous and exotic, require a maximum containment facility and pose a high individual risk of exposure and risk to laboratory personnel—e.g., Bolivian and Argentine hemorrhagic fevers, Marburg virus, Ebola virus, Lassa fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever and other various hemorrhagic diseases. BSL 4 agents may be transmitted by aerosol; there is no vaccine or therapy.

biosafety level

Epidemiology A classification for the degree of caution required when working with specific groups of pathogens. See Maximum containment facility.

biosafety level

(bī″ō-sāf′tē),

BSL

A classification system to indicate the safety precautions required when investigating microorganisms, esp. viruses known to be dangerous or lethal to those exposed to them. There are four BSLs, with BSL-4 requiring the highest level of security.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lab is one of 13 Biosafety Level 2 and 3 research facilities being built in the country, primarily with state and national
TIMELINE: Building dedicated February 2007 and now being used for biosafety level 2 research; biosafety level 3 labs expected to be up and running this summer
Remarkably, the UW IBC also decided, on the spot, to change the biosafety level of the new UW lab.
The first limitation is that all of these procedures require that the transfer of plasma into the second tube and the inactivation procedure be performed by trained personnel in a biosafety level 2 safety cabinet under rigorous safety practices.
Ninety-seven percent of respondents indicated that research classified as Biosafety Level 2 (BL-2) was being conducted at their institution, while 60 percent indicated that their institution had facilities suitable for BL-3 research.
A new, free white paper assists research institutions with the challenges of implementing biosafety level (BSL) 2+ practices and procedures in laboratory facilities.
Working under maximum-containment conditions in a biosafety level 4 facility in UTMB's Galveston National Laboratory, the team introduced mutations into the virus' genetic code at four locations thought to generate proteins that affected immune response.
Purifier[R] Logic[TM] Class II Biosafety Cabinets provide personnel, product and environmental protection and are suitable for work with agents requiring Biosafety level 1, 2 or 3 containment.
To the Editor: Recently, the directors of Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) laboratories in the United States published their views of the requirement of having [greater than or equal to] 2 persons present at all times while biological work is undertaken in a BSL-4 laboratory (1).
Currently, all operational biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) labs are overseen by HHS's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
The laboratory is one of 13 Biosafety Level 3 research facilities constructed nationally with substantial funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Determination of required biosafety practices involves various factors, including an understanding of the recommended Risk Group (also known as Biosafety Level (BSL) (Best et al.