bioprocess

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bioprocess

(bī′ō-prŏs′ĕs, -prō′sĕs)
n.
1. A technique that produces a biological material, such as a genetically engineered microbial strain, for commercial use.
2. Production of a commercially useful chemical or fuel by a biological process, such as microbial fermentation or degradation.

bi′o·proc′ess v.

bioprocess

Any process in which a living organism or the molecular machinery derived from a living system—e.g., enzymes, growth factors, regulator proteins—is used to obtain end products of interest.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, if the launch of blockbuster biopharmaceutical drugs for hepatitis, cancer, diabetes, and hemophilia (and the subsequent revenue surge for pharmaceutical companies in 2003) is any indication, more industries are likely to step up the deployment of bioprocesses.
However, if the launch of blockbuster biopharmaceutical drugs for hepatitis, cancer, diabetes, and hemophilia, and the subsequent revenue surge for pharmaceutical companies in 2003, is any indication, more industries are likely to step up the deployment of bioprocesses.
The elimination of several conventional steps used to synthesize vitamins and antibiotics has significantly reduced production cost and adverse impact on the environment, and this, in turn, is encouraging the acceptance of bioprocesses," says Nagel.
The Environment Sector focuses on the development of bioprocesses for the prevention, treatment and monitoring of pollution, as well as the development of new biotechnology applications related to fighting climate change and achieving sustainable industrial development.
It focuses on the development of novel bioprocesses with an emphasis on microbial fermentation.
Many of the chemicals that Hercules produces are derived from natural products, and Hercules has emerged at the forefront of developing novel bioprocesses for this sector.
Except for the historical information contained herein, this news release contains forward- looking statements including those relating to the ability of Maxygen and Hercules to develop and commercialize bioprocesses for the chemical industry; the ability of Maxygen's technologies to evolve new products in specialty chemicals and the attributes of those products; the potential payments resulting from the collaboration and the success and timing of commercialization routes.
Biomanufacturers have to invest in developing efficient bioprocesses both for current products and those under development.