biopiracy


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biopiracy

(bī′ō-pī′rə-sē)
n.
The commercial development of biological compounds or genetic sequences by a technologically advanced country or organization without obtaining consent from or providing fair compensation to the peoples or nations in whose territory the materials were discovered.

bi′o·pi′rate (bī′ō-pī′rĭt) n.
(1) The patenting of plants, genes, and other biological products that are indigenous to another country
(2) The unauthorised commandeering by wealthy nations or companies of biologically ‘interesting’ molecules—e.g., extremozymes, conotoxins, and others—from cash-poor, biodiversity-rich regions—e.g., Brazil—usually those lacking the financial resources to develop products or the legal resources to stop gene theft

biopiracy

The use of wild plants by international companies to develop medicines, without recompensing the countries from which they are taken.
References in periodicals archive ?
We don't want to lose these resources to biopiracy or threats that lead to their extinction or biodiversity loss,' Lim noted.
Conclusions: We suggest certain perspectives, by which we as scientists, may contribute towards prevention of biopiracy and also to foster the fair utilization of natural resources.
24) Some scholars have opined that although biopiracy in developing countries is a real concern, these countries lack the ability to address the issue without outside assistance.
The biopiracy cannot be allowed to continue unabated because of the assumed belief that the indigenous knowledge in Asia, Africa or Latin American is not published or documented.
It does not mean that such an argument is an excuse, but the excess of bureaucracy and different legal regulations certainly works at least as a contribution to our next subject, Biopiracy.
Hamilton C (2006) Biodiversity, biopiracy and benefits: what allegations of biopiracy tell us about intellectual property.
From the developing countries' perspective, this was a case of biopiracy, little different from Henry Wickham's stealing rubber seedlings in Brazil for Britain in the late nineteenth century, which led to the end of Brazil's rubber boom, or Richard Spruce's successful collection of the seeds of the cinchona tree, which ended the Andean monopoly on quinine.
To prevent biopiracy, the resoluton urged that the grant of a patent be made conditional upon a requirement to disclose the origin of genetic resources and traditional knowledge used in inventions and provide evidence of consent from authorities in the provider country and also evidence of fair benefit sharing.
Since then, because of this database, over 1000 cases of biopiracy have been identified and over 105 claims withdrawn or cancelled by patent offices," he added.
2011) Global Governance: Promoting Biodiversity and Protecting Indigenous Communities Against Biopiracy.
The Indian government has filed a biopiracy lawsuit against Monsanto for stealing indigenous plants to develop genetically modified versions of them to sell without any compensation going back to the people or nation where the plants originally came from.