biomorph


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biomorph

(bī′ō-môrf′)
n.
A nonrepresentational form or pattern that resembles a living organism in shape or appearance.

bi′o·mor′phic adj.
bi′o·mor′phism n.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the special interactive portion of the exhibit, the Biomorph desks were arranged contiguously to make the most of the desks' fluid lines.
The publisher even runs contests for expert biomorph breeders.
In northern Chile, explanations for the purpose(s) of the thousands of geoglyphs of biomorphs and geometric motifs that have been known since the mid-nineteenth century have changed over time, depending upon current prevailing theories.
The compositions are clumpy and his biomorphs lack personality.
For readers who missed The Second Self (happily, it is still in print), Life on the Screen provides more than enough to reflect upon - a seamless mixture of field notes, psychoanalytic interpretations, theory-enriched observations and explanations of MUDs, MOOs, biomorphs and the rest of cyberspace's dramatis personae.
These purely inorganic hierarchical materials, discovered by the IP of this project, form under geochemically plausible conditions and closely resemble typical biologically induced mineral textures and shapes, thus the name biomorphs .
He fits into a context there of artists I call biomorphs, but then, of course, those categories have overlaps, because Amino's work relates to somebody like Richard Lippold, who also has connections to Cage.
William Baziotes, that painter of cryptic biomorphs, considered him a hero.
Discusses fractals used to create fantastic biomorphs, with text on his techniques and computer system.
Combined in composites whose rhythms are complicated by patterns of paint, they may suggest totems, yes, or stylized biomorphs, and their materials carry a burden of history and use.
Throughout the early '80s, Cubist still-life concerns reappeared in paintings depicting coffee cups, shoes, and fragments of domestic interiors, while her Chicago connection insinuated itself in images of wispy, ghostly hands, wraithlike figures, and schematized animalistic biomorphs.
There is definitely something European about the two Smith series, for example--and Robert Storr, the author of the catalogue essay, is right in alluding to Hans Arp's biomorphs and to the paintings of Arp's wife, Sophie Taeuber--Arp.