biomimicry


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biomimicry

The structural or functional simulation of biomolecules by synthetic chemicals.
 
Molecular biology
The development of synthetic systems based on data that mimics biological systems.
 
Technology
The formal study of biological processes and systems as a model for creating synthetic structures similar to those produced in nature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kennedy, Director of External Relations, Biomimicry Research and Innovation Center, University of Akron, and Thomas A.
Biomimicry literature is full of thousands of cases studies and those are just the ones identified since author and innovation consultant Janine Benyus coined the term 20 years ago.
Findings: The study has put forward twelve propositions in order to correlate biomimicry and managerial concepts.
You see, biomimicry is inherently multi-disciplinary--it relies on chemists, physicists, engineers, biologists, doctors and others.
As Nicholas & Peterson (2015) posit, the reliance on naturally occurring design concepts and biomimicry represents the natural intersection of biology and engineering.
Biomimicry has great promise for helping us combat or at least adjust to climate change.
The non-profit Biomimicry Institute in Missoula, Montana, maintains an extensive database of natural solutions at www.
Richard MacCowan, director and co-founder of Biomimicry UK, said: "It's not just about sustainability.
The concept of engineering technology so that it copies nature is known as biomimicry.
Biomimicry is a fascinating look at how human inventions are inspired by nature.
Biomimicry applies solutions from the natural world to building design, like how solar panels replicate photosynthesis.
Biomimicry is a relatively new term for a fundamentally old concept- taking inspiration from nature to design innovative, sustainable buildings.