biomechanics

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biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.

biomechanics

Etymology: Gk, bios + mechane, machine
the study of mechanical laws and their application to living organisms, especially the human body and its locomotor system. biomechanic, biomechanical, adj.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]

biomechanics

the understanding of forces and their effects on (and by) the human body and implements.

biomechanics

relationship between external forces (e.g. body weight and external environment) and internal forces (e.g. active forces generated by muscle contraction and passive forces exerted on local structures by bones and joints) and the resultant effect of these forces on body movement

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics (bī´ōməkan´iks),

biomechanics

the application of mechanical laws to living structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Obviously Saqlain will continue his work with the bowler as well but Hurrion, a top biomechanist who understands how the human body functions, can provide some important tips.
Asked about Idowu, the 53-year-old said: "I'm in very regular contact with his coach, who is employed by me, his physiotherapist, who's employed by me and the biomechanist who is employed by UK Athletics.
Hasler, a medical doctor and biomechanist, has been working on the causes of whiplash-injuries and technologies to prevent them over the last decade.
I say sure, I'm not a biomechanist, but I know an awful lot of biomechanists and I know bowling coaches wouldn't even think of working without this software.
The Australian board wouldn't, because it knows more about who is a real biomechanist and who is just one in name.
Former Bliss spa founder Marcia Kilgore and biomechanist Dr David Cook have joined forces to create the fitflops, casual summer footwear aiming to not only be stylish but also work the legs when walking.
I'm going to see a lady to do physiocise and I'll be seeing a biomechanist.
The book discusses the role of the biomechanist in an investigation, biomechanical causation versus medical causation, the basic principles of biomechanics, approaches to the use of biomechanics in investigations, and application of biomechanical principles to impact injuries.
Over the next six weeks an expert biomechanist from the ICC's Approved List will be appointed to work with the bowler to identify and address any flaws that may occur during his delivery.
Within minutes, after consultation with Dr Peter Gregory, the England and Wales Cricket Board's chief medical officer and team biomechanist Nigel Stockill, Vaughan had a knee brace placed around the problem joint.
Nike biomechanist Gordon Valiant (left) helps Olympic gold medalist runner Cathy Freeman of Australia adjust to the equipment that will measure the pressure on her feet as she runs at the Nike World Headquarters.
Your chest muscles are the driving force behind a strong serve and forehand stroke," says Duane Knudson, a biomechanist (scientist who studies the physics of human movement) at California State University at Chico.

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