biomechanics


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biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.

biomechanics

Etymology: Gk, bios + mechane, machine
the study of mechanical laws and their application to living organisms, especially the human body and its locomotor system. biomechanic, biomechanical, adj.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]

biomechanics

the understanding of forces and their effects on (and by) the human body and implements.

biomechanics

relationship between external forces (e.g. body weight and external environment) and internal forces (e.g. active forces generated by muscle contraction and passive forces exerted on local structures by bones and joints) and the resultant effect of these forces on body movement

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics (bī´ōməkan´iks),

biomechanics

the application of mechanical laws to living structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
The three-time Major winner has been using biomechanics and kinetic sequencing to make himself an even greater player.
Golf biomechanics trains the muscles specific to the sport.
Andrew Bradley, commercial director, Sub-4 Sports Biomechanics; Max King, independent adviser, Business Link Staffordshire; and Clifton Bradley, managing director, Sub-4 Sports Biomechanics
The university can be very proud of the impact that all three of its young biomechanics researchers have had already on the international biomechanics com- munity.
The third efficient stride was a peculiar lope halfway between walking and running that resembles no gait known to biomechanics specialists.
2) To increase collaboration and the exchange of knowledge among biomechanics programs in the greater Southern California area.
Imbalances in strength, mismatched forces, inappropriate actions of assistance (synergistic) muscle contractions and excessive actions of opposing (antagonistic) muscle contractions can cause such disruptions in biomechanics of the body.
Due to its complex geometry and structure, the biomechanics of the pelvis is complicated.
It is much more than a biomechanics text: it addresses anatomy, biology, epidemiology, pathology, medico-legal issues, and briefly) therapeutic interventions.
Pertinent Data: Applications included in the brochure cover the fields of: combustion engine R&D, vehicle development, safety and control, manufacturing, plastics processing, biomechanics and specialty areas like pneumatics and hydraulics.
Biomechanics, using digital computer imaging to measure range of motion and other functions, is being used for both prevention of injuries and determination of an employee's fitness to return to work.
Chapters discuss wheelchair measurement, engineering fundamentals, biomechanics, electronics, and standards.