biomechanics

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biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.

biomechanics

Etymology: Gk, bios + mechane, machine
the study of mechanical laws and their application to living organisms, especially the human body and its locomotor system. biomechanic, biomechanical, adj.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]

biomechanics

the understanding of forces and their effects on (and by) the human body and implements.

biomechanics

relationship between external forces (e.g. body weight and external environment) and internal forces (e.g. active forces generated by muscle contraction and passive forces exerted on local structures by bones and joints) and the resultant effect of these forces on body movement

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics (bī´ōməkan´iks),

biomechanics

the application of mechanical laws to living structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
com FIGHTING FIT | FitFlop has expanded its range of biomechanically engineered footwear to introduce the Polar Sneaker, a boxing-style boot from its new slimline range.
These constructs have been shown to be as biomechanically sound as their cerclage wire counterparts and less likely to require removal.
No less than half a century ago, it was believed that man was "physiologically, biomechanically and indeed psychologically" incapable of breaking 10 seconds for the 100-metres sprint.
A2 and A4 pulleys are most important biomechanically, since the compromise of one or both of them can lead to significant loss of power and "bowstringing" of the flexor tendon in relation to the bone (3).
In fact, pulling the neck into the treatment hand contact is often biomechanically easier than pushing in with the treatment hand contact.
micronesica stems consistently exhibited pre-existing internal stem tissue damage where the trees failed biomechanically.
The study is of interest because the common wisdom is that the running population is biomechanically diverse, and it may not be advisable to willfully alter your form.
Clinically obtained 4 to 7 degree of the axial walls should satisfy biomechanically requirements.
Though both cutting implements are efficient in cutting typical materials that would be present in an entanglement situation, ideally the implement that requires the least amount of muscle activation would be more biomechanically suited in attempt to decrease overuse injury susceptibility.
This occurs in many dives but biomechanically it does not occur in a natural fall," says Morris.