biomechanics

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Related to biomechanical: biomechanical frame of reference, biomechanical assessment, biomechanical engineering

biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.

biomechanics

Etymology: Gk, bios + mechane, machine
the study of mechanical laws and their application to living organisms, especially the human body and its locomotor system. biomechanic, biomechanical, adj.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]

biomechanics

the understanding of forces and their effects on (and by) the human body and implements.

biomechanics

relationship between external forces (e.g. body weight and external environment) and internal forces (e.g. active forces generated by muscle contraction and passive forces exerted on local structures by bones and joints) and the resultant effect of these forces on body movement

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics (bī´ōməkan´iks),

biomechanics

the application of mechanical laws to living structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
19, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- ABEO biomechanical footwear, a leading comfort footwear brand, has launched an innovative new shearling collection in time for holiday shopping.
To the best of our knowledge, to date, no studies have evaluated the impact of tear edge fixation on the biomechanical properties of a transosseous-equivalent (TOE) rotator cuff repair construct.
If the biomechanical tests prove his action is illegal, Hafeez will be suspended from international cricket and will have to undergo remedial work on his bowling.
Meanwhile, the independent biomechanical analysis of the bowling action of Marlon Samuels concluded that his standard off-break delivery was bowled with a legal action, but that his quicker deliveries exceeded the 15 degrees' level of tolerance and thus, were considered to be illegal.
Employing the laws of physics and human tolerance, biomechanical engineers analyze the forces of the impact and whether a mechanism of injury existed during the impact.
Part of a four-volume series on biomechanical systems technology, this collection of research articles focuses on cardiovascular systems and how modern technologies have been developed to monitor and assess biological functions.
They don't leave the ground, which is the classical definition, but they do seem to bounce, the biomechanical definition.
He uses a consultancy based on a form of biomechanical analysis to plan his matings and evaluate his foals after they are born.
The biomechanical properties of the skin are significantly modified as age increases without any grade effect.
Drawn from the third edition of the "Biomedical Engineering Handbook", these seminal articles introduce current methods and strategies for modeling cellular mechanices, present topics in biofluid mechanics, feature more than 140 illustrations and 60 tables, and provide a number of useful equations to assist in modeling biomechanical behaviors.
The book discusses the role of the biomechanist in an investigation, biomechanical causation versus medical causation, the basic principles of biomechanics, approaches to the use of biomechanics in investigations, and application of biomechanical principles to impact injuries.
During loading, which is done manually by workers, the worker takes a very inadequate working position which, in combination with different dimensional characteristics and cargo masses results in increased biomechanical load on the spinal column.