biomaterial


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biomaterial

 [bi″o-mah-tēr´e-al]
any substance (other than a drug), synthetic or natural, that can be used as a system or part of a system that treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ, or function of the body; especially, material suitable for use in prostheses that will be in contact with living tissue.

bi·o·ma·ter·i·al

(bī'ō-ma-tē'rē-al),
A synthetic or semisynthetic material used in a biologic system to construct an implantable prosthesis and chosen for its biocompatibility.
[bio- + material]

biomaterial

/bio·ma·te·ri·al/ (bi″o-mah-tēr´e-al) a synthetic dressing with selective barrier properties, used in the treatment of burns; it consists of a liquid solvent (polyethylene glycol-400) and a powdered polymer.

biomaterial

(bī′ō-mə-tîr′ē-əl)
n.
A biocompatible material that is used to construct artificial organs, rehabilitation devices, or prostheses and replace natural body tissues.

biomaterial

(1) Any synthetic material or device—e.g., implant or prosthesis—designed to treat, enhance or replace an ageing, malfunctioning or cosmetically unacceptable native tissue, organ or function in the body.
(2) A native material used for its structural, not biological, properties—e.g., collagen in cosmetics, carbohydrates modified for biomedical applications or as bulking agents in food manufacture.

biomaterial

1. Any synthetic material or device–eg implant or prosthesis-intended to treat, enhance or replace an aging or malfunctioning–or cosmetically unacceptable—native tissue, organ or function in the body. See Bioengineering, Breast implants, Hybrid artificial pancreas, Shiley valve, Teflon, Total hip replacement.
2. A biomaterial used for its structural, not biological, properties–eg, collagen in cosmetics, carbohydrates modified by biotechnology to be used as lubricants for biomedical applications or as bulking agents in food manufacture.

bi·o·ma·te·ri·al

(bī'ō-mă-tēr'ē-ăl)
A synthetic or semisynthetic material chosen for its biocompatibility and used in a biologic system to construct an implantable prosthesis.

bi·o·ma·te·ri·al

(bī'ō-mă-tēr'ē-ăl)
A synthetic or semisynthetic material used in a biologic system to construct an implantable prosthesis and chosen for its biocompatibility.

biomaterial

synthetic materials, including metals, ceramics and polymers. See also biological implant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Metallic biomaterials segment contributed the highest revenue share to the global market, owing to highly used in orthopedic treatments for bone support and replacement, due to their strength and resistance to fatigue degradation.
In 2015, the metallic segment is expected to account for the larger share of the global biomaterials market, by type of material, while the cardiovascular segment is expected to account for the largest share of biomaterial market, by application.
The monthly, online-only journal would center on research in the quickly burgeoning field of biomaterials that includes the study of engineered or naturally derived materials that interact with biological systems.
His area of interest was the study on surface properties of biomaterials and its interaction on the blood compatibility and tissue compatibility.
MEDMIX Systems AG on Monday announced that it has developed a delivery system for use with standard single syringes to handle multi-component biomaterials.
Because of the body's unwelcoming reception, biomaterials developers have worked in recent years to create sophisticated materials that might interact with inner-body environments in a less provocative way.
TEPHA biomaterials have already been found to offer substantial promise as scaffolds for a range of tissue engineering applications.
Secant Medical[R] has established a new lab to perform polymer synthesis and analytical characterization of polymers, biomaterials and fibers.
In this application, Topas COC's glasslike clarity allows surgeons to see when the biomaterial is fully mixed and to gauge the amount delivered to the site, says Advanced Biomaterial Systems.
The researchers believe this biomaterial will prove most useful for treating fractures of the hip, wrist, and shin and for repairing joints and vertebrae.