biomagnification


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Related to biomagnification: bioaccumulation

biomagnification

(bī′ō-măg′nə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
The increasing concentration of a substance, such as a toxic chemical, in the tissues of organisms at successively higher levels in a food chain.

biomagnification

The result of bioaccumulation and biotransfer by which tissue concentrations of chemicals in organisms at one trophic level exceed tissue concentrations in organisms at the next lower trophic level in a food chain.

biomagnification

(bī″ō-mag″nĭ-fĭ-kā′shŏn) [ bio- + magnification]
The increase in the concentration of biologically active substances in organisms as they rise up the food chain. Pesticides are one example of a substance that biomagnifies. Trace concentrations of agricultural pesticides may be ingested by aquatic organisms, such as plankton. Plankton may be consumed by filter-feeding clams or small fish, which will store larger concentrations of toxins in fat or muscle. These animals may be eaten by predators such as trout or salmon, which may subsequently be consumed by carnivores such as bear, eagles, osprey, or humans. In each successive level of the food chain, higher and higher concentrations of pesticides will be found. Ultimately enough pesticide may be present in individual organisms to cause disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
metastability, enables their: i) long-range transport, bioaccurnulation in biological tissue, and, consequent, iii) biomagnification in ecological biocycles.
Additionally, there is risk of biomagnification of these hydrochar-bound toxicants into higher trophic levels.
Fortunately, cesium shows only modest biomagnification in marine food chains--much less than mercury, a toxic metal, or many other harmful organic compounds such the insecticide DDT and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Fisher said.
Other reason of this heavy amount of Pb in feed may be the biomagnification of both organic and inorganic fertilizers by plants, which eventually end up in the feed [18].
Among the topics are measuring gas phase mercury emissions from industrial effluents, microbial transformations in the mercury cycle, the effects of dissolved organic matter on mercury biogeochemistry, the exchange of elemental mercury between the oceans and the atmosphere, and the bioaccumulation and biomagnification of mercury through food webs.
Trophic transfer of metals along freshwater food webs: Evidence of cadmium biomagnification in nature.
methylmercury bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food webs, see id.
Resistance to degradation leads to bioaccumulation and biomagnification of dioxins in the food chain.
carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus) * Bioaccumulation and biomagnification of chemicals (e.
Mercury has become the subject of most concern due to its biomagnification potential and toxic effects to aquatic organisms and human health.
2001) Relationship between chromium biomagnification ratio, accumulation factor and mycorrhizae in plants growing on tannery effluent polluted soil.
35) Bioaccumulation and biomagnification of pesticides can also cause serious health problems for nonresidents if they regularly consume fish from the contaminated area.