biological weapon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

biological weapon

n.
A biological pathogen or toxin, such as the anthrax bacterium or the smallpox virus, that has been prepared for release on the battlefield or within a civilian population in sufficient concentration to cause widespread illness or death. Also called bioweapon.
Any pathogen—virus, bacteria, other disease-causing biological agent, or toxin produced by them—intended for use as a biological weapon.
Generic types
• Anti-personnel BWs
Ideal characteristics: High infectivity, high potency, no vaccines, aerosol delivery
• Anti-angriculture BWs: Herbicides, defoliants and other agents designed to destroy crops
Potential BWs Bacillus anthracis, botulinum toxin, Ebola virus, Argentine hemorrhagic fever virus, Q fever, Rift Valley fever, tularemia, Yersinia pestis
Defenses against BW Respirator or gas mask, protective shelter, decontamination, vaccination, antibiotics, detection systems
References in periodicals archive ?
But HJS's Associate Fellow Dr Bellamy van Aalst, a former EU and NATO bio-defense consultant, warned against complacency, in light of the relative availability of already-weaponized and readily-deployable biological weapons in Syria.
For the biological weapons office, this means analyzing and understanding the 1972 Biological and Toxins Weapons Convention and the 1925 Geneva Protocol.
THE ARMS CONTROL APPROACH: THE BIOLOGICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION AND ITS PROTOCOL
Unlike nuclear weapons, which destroy everything in the target area, biological weapons leave infrastructure intact.
Smith considers the possibility that military policy in regard to biological weapons and defence against them could have been formed in the post-Second World War world on the basis of a realist appreciation of the potential and the danger of such weapons.
All things considered, The Soviet Biological Weapons Program is relevant and worthwhile to the Air Force community.
Continue reading "Nazis Wanted to Use Malaria-Ridden Mosquitos as Biological Weapons During World War II" at.
Such contributions are necessary if the UN is to be able to transform the ambitious political goals of international agreements to counter the use of biological weapons into concrete results.
More than 167 nations have signed the United Nations Biological Weapons Convention.
The Biological Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production,
The visit comes to participate in the 2010 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) Meeting of Experts that will be held at the United Nations Office at Geneva from 23 to 27 August.
Despite the continued utility of the "strategy of arms control," we argue in this article that the international community is constructing an ill-considered and potentially dangerous biological weapons taboo that rebukes its fundamental logic.

Full browser ?