biological response modifier


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modifier

 [mod´ĭ-fi-er]
1. an agent or method that causes something else to change.
biologic response modifier (BRM) (biological response modifier) a method or agent, such as a cytokine, monoclonal antibody, or vaccine, that alters host-tumor interaction. This is usually accomplished by amplifying the antitumor mechanisms of the immune system, but it also may be effected by mechanisms that affect host or tumor cell characteristics, either directly or indirectly. Called also biomodulator.
problem modifier on level three of the problem classification scheme of the omaha system, either of the two sets of terms used in conjunction with client problems, allowing the nurse to identify ownership of the problem and its degree of severity in relation to client interest, risk factors, and signs or symptoms.

biological response modifier

n.
A substance, such as interferon, that is produced naturally or manufactured as a drug designed to strengthen, direct, or restore the body's immune response against infection or cancer.

biological response modifier

Any of a broad family of biomolecules that up- or down-regulate, or restore immune responsiveness, which are generated after T cells recognise an antigen present on the surface of a self-antigen-presenting cell which, once activated, produce multiple cytokines.
 
Types of BRMs
Interferons, interleukins, colony-stimulating factors, TNFs, B-cell growth factor, B-cell differentiating factors, eosinophil chemotactic factor, lymphotoxin, macrophage chemotactic factor, macrophage activating factor, macrophage inhibiting factor, osteoclast-activating factor, and others.

Therapeutic effects of BRMs
• Regulation and/or increased immune response;
• Cytotoxic or cytostatic activity against tumour cells;
• Inhibition of metastasis or cell maturation;
• Stimulation of BM stem cells, required for recuperation from cytotoxic insult secondary to chemotherapy.

biological response modifier

Immunology Any of a broad family of natural or synthetic molecules that up- or down-regulate, or restore immune responsiveness Types of BRMs Interferons, ILs, CSFs, TNFs, B-cell growth factor, B-cell differentiating factors, eosinophil chemotactic factor, lymphotoxin, macrophage chemotactic factor, macrophage activating factor, macrophage inhibiting factor, osteoclast-activating factor, and others; BRMs are generated after a T cell recognizes an antigen present on the surface of a self antigen-presenting cell which, once activated, produces a multiple lymphokines–cytokines Therapeutic effects of BRMs
1. Regulation and/or increased immune response;.
2. Cytotoxic or cytostatic activity against tumor cells;.
3. Inhibition of metastasis, or cell maturation;.
4. Stimulation of BM stem cells, required for recuperation from cytotoxic insult secondary to chemotherapy. See B cell, Colony-stimulating factor, Interferon, Interleukin, T cell, Tumor necrosis factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of such side effects, researchers working with biological response modifiers are cautious not to be overly optimistic about the drugs.
As a class, biological response modifiers will, without a doubt, continue to make a major impact on the rheumatoid arthritis market.
TABLE 53 U S MARKET FOR BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE MODIFIERS,
CHAPTER FIVE: WORLDWIDE BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE MODIFIERS AND IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE DRUG MARKETS
Currently, the company has exclusive worldwide rights from its largest shareholder, Argyll Biotechnologies, LLC, to market, sell and distribute SF-1019, a compound that was developed from extensive research into Biological Response Modifiers (BRMs).
The collagen used in BioSTAR[R] also is a platform for timed release of biological response modifiers (genes, cells, proteins and drugs).
Unique to this report is the comprehensive nature of compiled biological response modifiers currently in clinical testing.
An alternative approach is the use of biological response modifiers or adjuvants.
The market for rheumatoid arthritis therapeutics has experienced remarkably strong growth during the past five years due to the introduction of the biological response modifiers (BRMs) to treatment regimens.

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