biological plausibility

biological plausibility

a method of reasoning used to establish a cause-and-effect relationship between a biological factor and a particular disease.

biological plausibility

A term referring to the results of research or a trial which are believable in terms of current scientific biological knowledge.
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They also assessed the biological plausibility of specific characteristics identified in epidemiologic studies as potentially conferring susceptibility to PM-related health effects.
Although the results from the epidemiological literature ate mixed regarding morbidity effects from PM exposure, the evidence from controlled human exposure and toxicological studies provides biological plausibility for PM-related cardiovascular effects in older adults.
These facts establish the biological plausibility for a qualitative association with SHS though one might predict a lower risk for the bystander.
These experiments provide biological plausibility for the hypothesis that exposure to PBDEs could disrupt normal development of the central nervous system in vivo.
So when is biological plausibility enough to support a change in practice?
The well-known association of sweetened beverages with obesity and type 2 diabetes, which are risk factors for heart failure, reinforces the biological plausibility of (the) findings.
For medical product evaluations, the criteria of temporality and biological plausibility may be the most familiar to researchers.
Scientific experts across diverse fields were asked to critically examine pertinent human and experimental animal literature and provide an assessment of the strength and biological plausibility of findings, the most useful and relevant experimental models, and data gaps for future research.
The rule of thumb for what was perceived as "good science" in their world was lots of expert opinion, biological plausibility speculation, limited data, and no replication.
Taking into account the biological plausibility that fertility drugs could cause cancer in children, these results are strong enough to cause concern," said Dr.
These ideas may be built on a strong basis of observation, or may hypothesise possible new clinical applications for herbal medicines based on biological plausibility due to known actions and chemical constituents.
This trial serves as a sobering reminder of the fallibility of intuitive assumptions of benefit based on biological plausibility and weak evidence.