biological evolution


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Related to biological evolution: Chemical evolution

biological evolution

The evolution of a species as part of its adaptation to its environment.
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Biological Evolution as the Nexus of Debate over ID
Biological evolution has no end goals; those creatures that survive then reproduce.
Theories of biological evolution are based on the principle of natural selection as formulated by Charles Darwin.
The first is to address the array of cultural influences that influence psychological processes beyond simple issues of mere national origin to take into account such influences as professional cultures, historical changes in culture, social class, geographical regions, political culture, frontier settlement, religion, and gender and the second is to interweave into these discussions considerations of new psychological theories of cultural origins and development ranging from biological evolution to divisions of labor and other aspects of social class.
It considers the major evolutionary changes that have affected the human body and its processes, cultural and social shifts that have contributed to changes in diet and activity, and documents cultural and biological evolution as separate processes.
Studying athletes-since most sports are meticulous in keeping statistics-provides an insight into the biological evolution of human design in nature, which Bejan terms the constructal-law theory.
Pagel, however, wondered whether language evolution proceeds much like biological evolution.
Humans, the most complex product of biological evolution, will over long periods of time evolve to greater complexity, or give way to a species of greater complexity.
However, in this chapter, interesting as it is in itself, the question of biological evolution gets lost.
Once homo sapiens learned this trick, all sorts of innovations could be passed on from person to person, group to group, meaning culture could change and diversify at a rate that far exceeds the glacial progress of biological evolution.
Distin develops a theory of information and its inheritance, which enables us to understand how cultural evolution has taken off in humans as a process independent from biological evolution.
These concepts are patently applicable to political theory because biological evolution and politics alike are direct consequences of the perpetual competition for scarce resources.

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