biographical

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biographical

adjective Pertaining or referring to a biography, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Freudian notion of "family romance" provides a revealing template for understanding what the story (ostentatiously) conceals biographically.
At formative moments of our careers, those of us--including the editors of Kritika--who entered the field toward the end of the Soviet era, and who are therefore of the "middle" generation, had plenty of reason to feel biographically inadequate: we had arrived too late, when all the excitement was already over.
That the preferred term frequently is "Catholic" rather than "Christian" (though biographically it is accurate enough) seems to me a trifle tendentious given the essential catholicity (small c) of many aspects of his worldview.
Recognition of this integration is now a commonplace in Smith studies, but it has yet to be treated biographically.
The images and their presentation are explored in terms of how scenes were organized, biographically or chronologically, how meaning is achieved by repetition, symbolic objects, juxtaposition, and typology and why specific scenes may refer to events associated with the life of the patron; this is similarly argued (143) for the Psalter of Queen Ingeborg (Chantilly, Mus.
Contextual essays place the actors biographically and aesthetically, and Maher has heavily laced them with extended quotations from her interviews and other sources.
Each author is outlined both biographically and bibliographically and also located contextually.
It is precise, lucid, and revelatory; it brilliantly demonstrates how genetic criticism can renew our understanding of a writer's oeuvre, and it offers a biographically inflected reading of Flaubert's writings along with what is, in effect, a profound insight into how one can approach the intersection of life and art.
This inward focus emerges biographically in the isolation of Stevens's life, as well as poetically in a hermetic diction and an utter confoundedness regarding the inner states of other beings, especially in his later work (two titles from the 1947 book Transport to Summer are exemplary: "Continual Conversation with a Silent Man"; "Wild Ducks, People and Distances").
In Mead and Modernity, Filipe Carreira da Silva situates George Herbert Mead's ideas biographically, politically and historically.
The odd fact is that this aesthetic shift was, biographically speaking, proleptic insofar as it began before the disasters--the studio fire, cancer and a car crash--that befell him at the end.
Only four people have ever tried to write biographically about Magnus.