biogeography

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Related to biogeographic: Biogeographic provinces

biogeography

(bī′ō-jē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The study of the geographic distribution of organisms.

bi′o·ge·og′ra·pher n.
bi′o·ge′o·graph′ic (-jē′ə-grăf′ĭk), bi′o·ge′o·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

biogeography

The study of the distribution of different species of organisms in differing geographic regions (ecosystems) and the factors that influenced that distribution.

biogeography

scientific study of the geographic distribution of living organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biogeographic evidence (BG) places the crown age of Psocidae near 260 Mya (212.
Woody flora and trees, providing habitat structure and therefore being biotic drivers of animal distribution, also have a strong influence on the biogeographic structure of many animal groups (Rueda et al.
This discrepancy could be due to the aforementioned biogeographic differences in macroalgae abundance.
Reefs were coded as island or mainland within each biogeographic province, San Diegan (warm temperate) or Oregonian (cold temperate).
In order to isolate the exogenous variation in the timing of agricultural transition, geographic distance to the Neolithic point of origin and an index of biogeographic endowments are used as instruments.
Biogeographic areas and transition zones of latinamerica and the caribbean islands based on panbiogeographic and cladistic analyses of the entomofauna.
Bats of northwestern Durango, Mexico: species richness at the interface of two biogeographic regions.
Biogeographic patterns and dispersal pathways were analyzed using PAE, a quantitative biogeographic method used for reconstructing hierarchical area relationships in the absence of phylogenetic information (Rosen & Smith 1988).
Traditionally, these differences have led to a separation of the Archipelago into two or three island biogeographic groups according to different authors.
2004); (iii) a biogeographic transition zone at 30[degrees]S (Camus, 2001; Thiel et al.
Under the NIPAS System, 240 biogeographic zones, representing 3,570,000 hectares of mountains, rivers, wetlands, and marine areas were declared "protected areas" (PAs).