biogeography

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biogeography

(bī′ō-jē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The study of the geographic distribution of organisms.

bi′o·ge·og′ra·pher n.
bi′o·ge′o·graph′ic (-jē′ə-grăf′ĭk), bi′o·ge′o·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

biogeography

The study of the distribution of different species of organisms in differing geographic regions (ecosystems) and the factors that influenced that distribution.

biogeography

scientific study of the geographic distribution of living organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wells' The Grisly Folk, the most straightforward, is a narrative representation of Boule's and Keith's views of Neanderthals as a dead-end side-branch of humanity, combined with ideas of invasion and extinction derived from biogeographers such as Alfred Wallace and William Matthew (Bowler 1995:189).
Since biogeographers frequently use mensurative scales in their methodology, and since nature is strongly scale dependent (Allen & Starr 1982), it is prudent to investigate the effects of transitions from one scale to another.
This contraction fragmented the birds' habitat and saw populations of these endemic species split and become isolated: a process biogeographers call `vicariance'.
This sharp and apparently arbitrary division, known as Wallace's Line, was an important and interesting puzzle for many biogeographers following Wallace.
However, one notable gap is a synthesis of the place in conservation of the largest insect order, Coleoptera, which are virtually ubiquitous in terrestrial and freshwater environments and immensely diverse in their richness and biology as well as being of interest to pest managers, collectors, biogeographers, conservation biologists and, indeed, naturalists and ecologists of many persuasions.
This is a question that still intrigues biogeographers, and their explanation is an outgrowth of the ideas that Gray posited in the 19th century (Wen, 1999).
Until recently, flooded forests have not captured the attention of avian biogeographers (Cohn-Haft et al.
Most biogeographers divide the Holarctic region into two subunits, Palaearctic and Nearctic, lying in the Old and New World respectively.