biogenic amines


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bi·o·gen·ic a·mines

a class of compounds, each containing an amine group, produced by a living organism. This class normally does not include amino acids.

biogenic amines

A group of chemical compounds, most of which are important in neurotransmission. Included are norepinephrine, histamine, serotonin, and dopamine.
See also: biogenic
References in periodicals archive ?
Quantitative changes in bacteria, aminoacids and biogenic amines in sardine (Sardina pilchardus), stored at ambient temperature (25-28?
Identification and quantitative measurements of biogenic amines and DOPA in the central nervous system and hamolymph of the crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus.
In addition, the levels of these biogenic amines vary considerably among individual ink sacs, and this variability is not due to differential oxidation of the ink during handling or to errors in measurement.
For this reason, study of formation and manifestation of defensive and food-seeking tasks and dynamics of biogenic amines and amino acids in the brain of the sturgeon fishes, depending on conditions of their living and age, appeared to be important.
Eight biogenic amines were investigated on wines, according to standards of putrescine (PUT) dihydrochloride, spermidine (SPD) trihydrochloride, spermine (SPM) tetrahydrochloride, agmatine (AGM) sulfate, cadaverine (CAD) dihydrochloride, serotonine (SRT) hydrochloride, histamine (HIM) dihydrochloride, tyramine (TYM), tryptamine (TRM) and 2-phenylethylamine (PHM) dihydrochloride purchased from Sigma Chemical Co.
Many biogenic amines are actively taken up and stored by platelets, which have no neurotransmitter synthesis capacity of their own (Audhya et al 2012).
1995), nitrogen degradability in the rumen of steers, particularly by the biogenic amine (BA) putrescine (Dawson and Mayne, 1997), have negative effects on visceral organs and meat quality (Fusi et al.
Stimulants are contraindicated in persons with hypersensitivity to biogenic amines such as norepinephrine.
The importance of analyzing biogenic amines arises from their pharmacological properties and toxicological aspects and also because they may be indicators of food quality since their occurrence is normally associated with inadequate sanitary conditions during vinification (SILLA-SANTOS, 1996; PEREIRA et al.
Specifically, the amounts of biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and thyramine) are informative because their presence reveals severe deviations in production technology and indicates product spoiling.
Biogenic amines and their production by microorganisms in food.