biofilm


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Related to biofilm: Quorum sensing

biofilm

 [bi´o-film″]
a thin layer of microorganisms adhering to the surface of a structure, which may be organic or inorganic, together with the polymers that they secrete.

biofilm

(bī'ō-film),
A thin coating containing biologically active agents, which coats the surface of structures such as teeth or the inner surfaces of catheter, tube, or other implanted or indwelling device. It contains viable and nonviable microorganisms that adhere to the surface and are trapped within a matrix of organic matter (for example, proteins, glycoproteins, and carbohydrates).

biofilm

(bī′ō-fĭlm′)
n.
A complex structure adhering to surfaces that are regularly in contact with water, consisting of colonies of bacteria that secrete a mucilaginous protective coating in which they are encased. Biofilms, which are resistant to antibiotics and disinfectants, corrode pipes and cause diseases such as lung infections, but they can be used beneficially to treat sewage, industrial waste, and contaminated soil.

biofilm

[bi′o-film′]
1 a well-organized colony of bacteria clustered together to form microcolonies. These colonies of bacteria attach to surfaces where they assume different characteristics from free-floating bacteria.
2 bacterial plaque that adheres tenaciously to tooth surfaces, restorations, and prosthetic appliances. See bacterial plaque.

biofilm

Microbiology
A slimy matrix of extracellular polymeric substances produced by bacteria which protects them when aggregated, as in dental plaque, the ear, intestine, skin, etc.

Molecular biology
A technique for immobilising cells by growing microorganisms on a thin layer of organic or inorganic materials including secreted polysaccharides and glycoproteins.

bi·o·film

(bī'ō-film)
Thin coating of microorganisms that forms on a body surface, especially the surface of a tooth.

biofilm

A slime-enclosed community of bacterial colonies that is very difficult to eradicate even with the most powerful antibiotics or sterilizing systems. Biofilms can occur on any body surface, on teeth (as dental plaque), medical equipment, medical tubing, contact lenses and elsewhere. They are held together by a matrix produced by the bacteria themselves and within this the bacteria communicate by chemical messengers, and generate proteins including enzymes that inactiovate some antibiotics. Biofilms also have major industrial and economic implications and are being intensively studied.

biofilm

a collection of microbial CELLS covered by and embedded in a matrix of EXTRACELLULAR microbial POLYMERS, such as mucilage or slime, at an interface. Biofilms are found, for example, on the surface of stones in rivers and ponds, in water pipelines, as DENTAL PLAQUE on TEETH and on surgical implants. Microorganisms within biofilms appear to be less susceptible to BIOCIDES than their planktonic counterparts. The extracellular polymer and/or nutrient limitation associated with position of organisms in the film may alter sensitivity. Biofilms allow for the rapid spread of genetic material between the component microorganisms. Biofilm formation can have serious implications in industrial, environmental, medical and public health situations.

bi·o·film

(bī'ō-film)
A thin coating containing biologically active agents, which coats the surface of structures such as teeth or the inner surfaces of catheter, tube, or other implanted or indwelling device. It contains viable and nonviable microorganisms that adhere to the surface and are trapped within a matrix of organic matter (e.g., proteins, glycoproteins, and carbohydrates).

biofilm,

n a very thin layer of microscopic organisms that covers the surface of an object.
biofilm, bacterial plaque,
n a thick grouping of microorganisms that are very resistant to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents and that live on gingival tissues, teeth, and restorations, causing caries and periodontal disease; also known as
bacterial plaque biofilm.
biofilm, dental,
n See biofilm, bacterial plaque.
biofilm, plaque,
n See plaque.
biofilm, waterline,
n a microbial growth that adheres to the waterlines used in dental procedures. Poses a serious risk for immunocompromised individuals.
References in periodicals archive ?
The goal of this short course is to provide the participants with the electrochemical techniques used to study extracellular electron transfer in the electrochemically active biofilms that are used in microbial fuel cells and other Bioelectrochemical systems.
To assess efficacy, after a 7-day biofilm formation period, sheep received twice-daily flushes of AB-PA01 or saline for one week.
The authors demonstrated that the degradation of these polymers, and the concomitant dissipation of the biofilm, causes a decrease in the xCELLigence biosensor signal that is both time- and dose-dependent.
First is the slow or incomplete penetration of antibiotics in bacterial biofilms and the second is the altered chemical microenvironment within the biofilm which prevents the access of antibiotics to the bacterial cells embedded in the community.
Since biofilm impacts product stability, GEA SAFEXPERT(tm) will also extend the shelf life of the products.
Recientemente fue descripta la formacion de biofilm en estreptococos relacionados con S.
Biofilm formation, carbonate precipitation and salt tolerance are the mechanisms which offer unconventional and eco-friendly techniques to improve soil structure and crop yield in saline soil.
We were able to use the microbe's own tools against them to attack and destroy the sugar molecules that hold the biofilm together," researcher Don Sheppard, director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the McGill University Health Center, said in the university statement.
In therapeutic and industrial situations, bacteria are found mostly as biofilm cells and not as planktonic cells (Kawarai et al.