bioethics


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bioethics

 [bi″o-eth´iks]
the application of ethics to the biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and health care. The practical ethical questions raised in everyday health care are generally in the realm of bioethics.

bioethics

/bio·eth·ics/ (-eth´iks) obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

bioethics

[bī′ō·eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, bios, life + ethos, the habits of humans or animals
obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

An evolving, multidisciplinary—ethics, philosophy and sociology—field of allied health care, which examines the impact of life sciences on society.

Issues of bioethics
Doctor-patient relationships, medical decision making, futility of medical care in certain patient groups, healthcare rationing, patients’ rights, physician-assisted suicide, involvement in cases that require unbiased patient advocacy.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics

The study of the ethical and moral questions arising from the growing possible application of biological and genetic knowledge, especially in BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.

bioethics

a study of the ethical issues relating to biological, medical and other scientific research and applications. Bioethics considers the perceived risks and benefits of the technologies involved, and their impact on society The major principles on which ethical decision-making is based are: benevolence (doing good, acting in the best interests of an individual and of all, securing their well-being); non-maleficence (preventing harm); autonomy (acting in a way that maximizes freedom of choice for the individual); confidentiality (respecting privacy of information) and justice (treating all fairly, unless there are morally relevant differences between people).

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics,

n the study of social and moral issues raised in the field of biology, including medicine and dentistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is also intended to encourage and foster research in the field of bioethics by featuring the results of a research project, funded by the Qatar National Research Fund, which has brought together the writings of scholars and theorists in a multi-lingual searchable 'Islamic Medical and Scientific Ethics' database.
The importance of this to the future of medical humanities and bioethics is clear.
Philosophers see bioethics as a fundamentally normative enterprise--(how to think about) what should be done in specific situations that we consider 'medical'.
While some believe or hope that including bioethics in the formal curriculum will make students more ethical when they become doctors, it is naive to think that formal teaching will uniformly have this effect.
This paper has simply attempted to problematize the way bioethics turns to law as the solution to biotechnology.
In his first chapter, "Framework for Understanding the Thinning of a Public Debate," Evans provides a succinct summary of what he sees as the historic development of the profession of bioethics and the limitation of the ethical debate on HGE.
The nation, however, has lacked an adequate mechanism to do this work of public bioethics for more than a decade.
This second edition of A Companion to Bioethics, fully revised and updated to reflect the current issues and developments in the field, covers all the material that the reader needs to thoroughly grasp the ideas and debates involved in bioethics.
Muscat, March 15 (ONA) The participants at the 1st International Bioethics Conference, organized by the National Bioethics Committee (NBC), in collaboration with the Sultan Qaboos University (SQU), the Research Council and UNESCO during March 8th -10th, 2015, have sent a cable of thanks and gratitude to His Majesty Sultan Qaboos Bin Said on the occasion of concluding the conference.
Muscat: Offering a platform for exchange of information and knowledge about bioethics and for networking, the First International Bioethics Conference, organised by the Oman National Bioethics Committee, in collaboration with Sultan Qaboos University, the Research Council (TRC), and Unesco, commenced on Sunday at the SQU.
Dr Shabana, visiting assistant professor and research director of the Islamic Bioethics Project at SFS-Q, won the prize for his presentation titled "Sustaining Islamic Bioethics Research.
Bioethics mediation; a guide to shaping shared solutions, rev.