bioethics

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bioethics

 [bi″o-eth´iks]
the application of ethics to the biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and health care. The practical ethical questions raised in everyday health care are generally in the realm of bioethics.

bioethics

/bio·eth·ics/ (-eth´iks) obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

bioethics

[bī′ō·eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, bios, life + ethos, the habits of humans or animals
obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

An evolving, multidisciplinary—ethics, philosophy and sociology—field of allied health care, which examines the impact of life sciences on society.

Issues of bioethics
Doctor-patient relationships, medical decision making, futility of medical care in certain patient groups, healthcare rationing, patients’ rights, physician-assisted suicide, involvement in cases that require unbiased patient advocacy.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics

The study of the ethical and moral questions arising from the growing possible application of biological and genetic knowledge, especially in BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.

bioethics

a study of the ethical issues relating to biological, medical and other scientific research and applications. Bioethics considers the perceived risks and benefits of the technologies involved, and their impact on society The major principles on which ethical decision-making is based are: benevolence (doing good, acting in the best interests of an individual and of all, securing their well-being); non-maleficence (preventing harm); autonomy (acting in a way that maximizes freedom of choice for the individual); confidentiality (respecting privacy of information) and justice (treating all fairly, unless there are morally relevant differences between people).

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics,

n the study of social and moral issues raised in the field of biology, including medicine and dentistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
And, of course, many bioethicists rely on their own philosophical biases.
Bioethicists, according to Smith, are the "new high priests" of a medical ideology that "focuses on the relationship between medicine, health, and society.
The people who adopted this new form of discourse--or converted to it--began calling themselves bioethicists.
Now, many bioethicists believe that Cohen's experiment with cytoplasmic transfer was just one more small step towards a world in which eugenics is another name for making babies.
The Scientist & the Ethicist" series presents conversations with prominent bioethicists discussing topical ethical issues related to reproductive and genetic technologies and the impact of these growing fields on women and their families.
Apparently, practitioners believe we need more bioethicists to tell us what to do in future biotechnological research.
Bioethicists have long been called upon to comment on a variety of topics, but bioethics is increasingly becoming a topic for comment itself.
Law and custom both prohibit the sale of cadaveric tissue, a ban heartily supported by bioethicists like Arthur Caplan, the influential director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Bioethics.
Wolpe and McGee, two prominent American bioethicists, state that " .
In addition to faculty bioethicists, the Center will be staffed with pediatric-trained patient advocates who will work directly with patients and families to ensure appropriate safeguards and to facilitate and enhance communication with medical and research staff.
She'd like to see doctors, bioethicists, and others evaluate current information on CT screening and then make recommendations for a code of conduct.
The code, published in the March 13 edition of the Vatican newspaper, L'Osservatore Romano, is being distributed to bioethicists who will be asked to sign it and return it to the Vatican.