bioethics

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bioethics

 [bi″o-eth´iks]
the application of ethics to the biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and health care. The practical ethical questions raised in everyday health care are generally in the realm of bioethics.

bioethics

/bio·eth·ics/ (-eth´iks) obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

bioethics

[bī′ō·eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, bios, life + ethos, the habits of humans or animals
obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

An evolving, multidisciplinary—ethics, philosophy and sociology—field of allied health care, which examines the impact of life sciences on society.

Issues of bioethics
Doctor-patient relationships, medical decision making, futility of medical care in certain patient groups, healthcare rationing, patients’ rights, physician-assisted suicide, involvement in cases that require unbiased patient advocacy.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics

The study of the ethical and moral questions arising from the growing possible application of biological and genetic knowledge, especially in BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.

bioethics

a study of the ethical issues relating to biological, medical and other scientific research and applications. Bioethics considers the perceived risks and benefits of the technologies involved, and their impact on society The major principles on which ethical decision-making is based are: benevolence (doing good, acting in the best interests of an individual and of all, securing their well-being); non-maleficence (preventing harm); autonomy (acting in a way that maximizes freedom of choice for the individual); confidentiality (respecting privacy of information) and justice (treating all fairly, unless there are morally relevant differences between people).

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics,

n the study of social and moral issues raised in the field of biology, including medicine and dentistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
The theory of symphonology also addresses the weaknesses inherent in the bioethical principles of utilitarianism and deontology.
It is the sole essay in a section entitled 'The Incredible Search for Bioethical Professionalism', and it examines the contradictions generated by the clinical ethicists' claim to be members of a profession whilst also maintaining there is not such thing as ethical or moral expertise, at least insofar as a claim to expertise involves 'goods or ends' (i.
The potential disjuncture between corporate and bioethical goals highlights a second distinguishing feature of bioethics consultation: the consequences of ignoring bioethical advice are quite different from the consequences of ignoring other types of advice.
After outlining his perspective, Drane spends the remainder of the book applying it to various bioethical issues pertaining to life, death, and technology.
The bioethical principles provide a foundation for the discussion and assist in reaching a decision for the immediate care plan.
Bioethics institutes, rather than being oriented around the transmission of rule-based knowledge, should provide a robust, interdisciplinary curriculum that produces thinkers capable of exploring the complex context of bioethical issues and proposing mechanisms to resolve present conflicts.
In a Traditional Christian context, bioethical problems are only ostensibly moral.
Through directed reading, discussion, writing, and presentations, students grapple with bioethical dilemmas and attempt to apply principles of diverse moral systems (e.
That study also concluded that the programs may prompt students to think and talk about bioethical issues.
The breakneck speed of scientific developments in embryonic stem (ES) cell technologies is, commensurately, ushering forth new bioethical debate(s) regarding these cells.
Whereas mainstream bioethical discourse associates autonomy with having choices, the concept of autonomy does not seem adequate to capture concerns that exist outside this discourse.
Now teachers will have an innovative approach for students to address these and other bioethical questions.