biochemist


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biochemist

A person with an advanced degree in biochemistry who is scientifically (but not medically) qualified to provide opinions on the significance of normal and abnormal values in body fluid chemistries.
References in periodicals archive ?
1973 By transferring a gene from an African clawed toad into the DNA of a bacteria, biochemists Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer pioneer genetic engineering.
I am a past-Chairman of the Association of Clinical Biochemists and of its Education Committee.
The role of a biochemist is to work on problems," he says, "not just throw up his hands and say that since it's not obvious how some biochemical cascade may have evolved, then it must therefore be the result of design.
And he said Reynolds closed the lab and fired the biochemists purely for business reasons: It was cheaper to fund the research at better-equipped academic labs.
Both studies' findings are "controversial" and "important,' says biochemist Balz Frei of Oregon State University in Corvallis.
The crew delivered biochemist Shannon Lucid and more than 2 tons of cargo to the Russian outpost and transferred 1,200 pounds of equipment from Mir to the shuttle.
Medcalf, a biochemist at Monash University in Victoria, Australia.
Lucid, 53, a biochemist and the first woman to fly in space five times, is to remain aboard Mir until August, when Atlantis will return with her replacement, NASA astronaut John Blaha.
DeLuca, a biochemist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is planning to seek regulatory approval to test 2MD in people by the end of the year.
Ross, an oncologist and biochemist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and her colleagues found evidence that HIP1 is produced in 50 of them, including cancers of the prostate, colon, breast, ovary, kidney, lung, and skin.
Herschler, founder of MSM Investments Company and the biochemist who invented and patented numerous health applications for methylsulfonylmethane.
With their strategy, the scientists will probably succeed in making antidotes against all six other types, predicts Bal Ram Singh, a biochemist at the University of Massachusetts in Dartmouth.