biochemical genetics


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

genetics

 [jĕ-net´iks]
the branch of biology dealing with the phenomena of heredity and the laws governing it.
biochemical genetics the study of the fundamental relationships between genes, protein, and metabolism. This involves the study of the cause of many specific heritable diseases. These include those resulting from the improper synthesis of hemoglobins and protein, such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia, both of which are hereditary anemias; some 200 inborn errors of metabolism, such as phenylketonuria and galactosemia, in which lack or alteration of a specific enzyme prohibits proper metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, or fats and thus produces pathologic symptoms; and genetically determined variations in response to certain drugs, for example, isoniazid.
clinical genetics the study of the causes and inheritance of genetic disorders. In addition to the diseases mentioned under biochemical genetics, other aspects of clinical genetics include the study of chromosomal aberrations, such as those that cause mental retardation and down syndrome, and immunogenetics, or the genetic aspects of the immune response and the transmission of genetic factors from generation to generation.

Many pediatric hospital admissions involve genetic disorders. In obstetrics and neonatal medicine, prenatal diagnosis of genetic defects and improvement of pre- and perinatal conditions are a major concern. In adults, such diseases as breast cancer, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus have all been found to have predisposing genetic components that are relevant to identification of risk factors and early diagnosis.

bi·o·chem·i·cal ge·net·ics

the study of genetics in terms of the chemical (biochemical) events involved, as in the manner in which DNA molecules replicate and control the synthesis of specific enzymes by the genetic code.

biochemical genetics

genetics

the branch of biology dealing with the phenomena of heredity and the laws governing it. Expressed in other definitions, e.g. population genetics.

biochemical genetics
the science concerned with the chemical and physical nature of genes and the mechanism by which they control the development and maintenance of the organism.
The field of biochemical or molecular genetics is relatively new and is increasingly used to define the cause of many inherited diseases. These diseases usually result from defective protein synthesis, such as hemophilia A and immunodeficiency, and more than 200 so-called 'inborn errors' of metabolism identified thus far in animals, such as mannosidosis and galactosemia, in which lack or alteration of a specific enzyme prohibits proper metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins or fats and thus produces clinical signs.
clinical genetics
the study of the possible genetic factors influencing the occurrence of a pathological condition. In addition to the diseases mentioned under biochemical genetics, other aspects of clinical genetics include the study of chromosomal aberrations, such as those that cause testicular hypoplasia, and immunogenetics, or the genetic aspects of the immune response and the transmission of genetic factors from generation to generation.
molecular genetics
the study of the molecular structure of genes, involving DNA and RNA. See also deoxyribonucleic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Research interests include the metabolic characterization of mitochondrial disease, the development of new methods for laboratory screening and diagnosis, and new educational approaches for teaching biochemistry and biochemical genetics to medical students and fellows.
Departments of (1) Genetics, (2) Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and (3) Child Development, Rehabilitation, and Biochemical Genetics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Assistant Professor and Director, Biochemical Genetics Program, Division of Medical Genetics, also of Stanford Medical School, played a major role in the pre-clinical research and design of the protocol for this clinical trial.
Suwannarat trained in Pediatrics at Inova Fairfax Hospital for Children and completed her training and board certification in Clinical Genetics and Clinical Biochemical Genetics at the National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH.
Techniques in diagnostic human biochemical genetics, a laboratory manual.
Gregory Enns, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the Biochemical Genetics Program, Stanford University School of Medicine.
founding head of the Biochemical Genetics and Metabolomics Laboratory and the founding Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at UC San Diego.
Heping Cao's notable areas of research experience include: protein/enzyme expression, purification, structure, function, enzymology, and proteomics; biochemical genetics and metabolic pathways, including carbohydrate, lipid and RNA metabolism; and signal transduction pathways with particular expertise in tristetraprolin and brassinosteroids.
She is board certified in Pediatrics and Clinical and Clinical Biochemical Genetics (lifetime certificates).
Enns, MB, ChB, Assistant Professor and Director, Biochemical Genetics Program, Division of Medical Genetics.
Feldman is also the Program Director for the Medical Genetics Residency and the Medical Biochemical Genetics Fellowship programs at the Detroit Medical Center/Wayne State University School of Medicine.
in genetics at Cornell University where he expanded the nascent discipline of biochemical genetics.

Full browser ?