bioceramic


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bioceramic

A biocompatible ceramic composed of calcium and phosphates—e.g., hydroxyapatite or tricalcium phosphate—which is either intended as a permanent replacement, such coating gliding surfaces to reduce wear in prosthetic joints, or as a temporary structure, as in the case of bioresorbable pins, plates and screws.

bioceramic

Orthopedic surgery A calcium phosphate–eg, hydroxyapatite or tricalcium phosphate, used to coat the gliding surfaces of artificial joints and ↓ wear and tear in prosthetic joints. See Total hip replacement, Total knee replacement.
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The partnership combines the expertise and capabilities in bioceramic materials of DSM with Cerapedics' growth factor, delivering a new product solution to improve people's lives," said David Yonce, vice president and global head of innovation at DSM Biomedical.
Ahsan, Synthesis of Ca-hydroxyapatite Bioceramic from Egg Shell and its Characterization.
According to the report, addition of alumina nanoparticles increases the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite bioceramic.
The tricalcium-phosphate bioceramic implants were prepared according to standard laboratory protocol [1, 3-5].
Lidocaine hydrochloride and polymer/water solutions were infiltrated in HAp bioceramic scaffolds using the vacuum impregnation technique at 700 mbar pressure for 15 min.
In applications for bioceramic coatings, bond coats should reduce the release of metal ions from the metallic substrate to the surrounding living tissue of mice (45) and human osteoblasts.
Some specific topics include oxide fiber-reinforced composites for gas turbine applications, the porous microstructure of yakbone bioceramic, properties and microstructure of CNT/AlN ceramics, and the effect of microstructure on the removal mechanisms of solid state sintered silicon carbide in polishing procedures.
Booth 1037) is advancing the science of bioceramic materials including dental implants, pacemaker/ defibrillator components, endoscopic surgical instruments, and implantable patient monitoring devices.
Bioceramics are strong and durable, and while no foreign material placed within a living body is ever completely compatible, the body is less likely to reject bioceramic parts.
The products have been coated with bioceramic powder that can release infrared rays to energize cells.
The list includes knives and scissors that never need sharpening, automobile engines of silicon nitride that weigh 40 percent less and have better heat resistance than current motors, noncorrosive bioceramic implants to replace joints in the aged, superconductors made from esoteric ceramic compounds, and ceramic hammers that can chip concrete.