bioavailability

(redirected from bioavailable)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bioavailability

 [bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te]
the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē),
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that is absorbed into the bloodstream.

bioavailability

/bio·avail·a·bil·i·ty/ (bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te) the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.

bioavailability

(bī′ō-ə-vā′lə-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The degree to which or rate at which a drug or other substance is absorbed or becomes available at the site of physiological activity after administration.

bi′o·a·vail′a·ble (-lə-bəl) adj.

bioavailability

[-əvā′libil′itē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + ME, availen, to serve
the degree of activity or amount of an administered drug or other substance that becomes available for activity in the target tissue.

bioavailability

The rate and extent to which a drug is available to serve as a substrate, bind to a specific molecule or participate in biochemical reactions in a target tissue after administration. For oral agents, bioavailability reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption.

Bioavailability depends on the pI (isoelectric point), the pH of a solution in which the solute does not migrate (ionic form), presence of side chains or the conformation of the epitope. Bioavailability is affected by the route of administration, rate of metabolism, lipid solubility and binding proteins. It is usually < 100% due to degradation or alteration before reaching the target tissue.

bioavailability

Clinical pharmacology The degree to which a drug is available to a target tissue after administration which, for oral drugs, reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption; BA is the in vivo presence of a substance in a form that allows it to be metabolized, serve as a substrate, bind a specific molecule, or participate in biochemical reactions. See Oral bioavailability.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that becomes available to exert a pharmacologic effect into the bloodstream.

bioavailability

The amount of a drug that reaches the blood regardless of how it is given. After intravenous injection bioavailability is 100%, but the bioavailability of drugs given by mouth is often much less, because many drugs are broken down by the digestive enzymes and many are poorly absorbed.

Bioavailability

A measure of the amount of drug that is actually absorbed from a given dose.
Mentioned in: Antiretroviral Drugs

bioavailability

physiological availability of a given amount of drug

bioavailability (bīˈ·ō··vālˈ··bilˑ·i·tē),

n the amount of or rate at which a substance or drug is accessible to the body.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
Physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency.

bioavailability

the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.
References in periodicals archive ?
What we have uncovered is a previously unknown source of bioavailable iron that is being delivered to the Earth's surface in precipitation.
The consultation relates to the assessment of the bioavailable chemical contamination of rivers of the Rhone-Mediterranean Basin.
It has become increasingly clear that the once-widespread impression that NAC is not orally bioavailable is incorrect.
Human clinical studies have shown that the Bio-Solv process used in the Q-Gel formulation makes CoQ10 several times more bioavailable than conventional supplement forms.
there is no doubt that these [anticancer] citrus compounds are bioavailable in animals to the site of a cancer.
We believe that we have the potential to transform treatment with orally bioavailable and non-addictive medications," said Maricich.
Gavin Bowman, executive product manager, minerals at Novus, explains, "MINTREX, a mineral chelated with HMTBa (the active ingredient in ALIMET feed supplement), is a highly bioavailable source of copper, zinc and manganese.
allows powdered colostrum to readily dissolve in liquids and ensures powdered colostrum and oral colostrum spray will bypass digestion: will be transported through the bowel wall; will circulate throughout the body; will reach the organs and cells, and will remain bioavailable at the cellular level.
The objective of the study was to evaluate circulating levels of total testosterone, SHB, and bioavailable testosterone in the cohort of the Asturias Study and their association with the degree of glucose tolerance and metabolic syndrome.
Telos Ceuticals, LLC has introduced Carogac, a bioavailable carotenoid source that contains lycopene, beta-carotene, vitamin C and zeaxanthin.