bioavailability


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bioavailability

 [bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te]
the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē),
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that is absorbed into the bloodstream.

bioavailability

/bio·avail·a·bil·i·ty/ (bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te) the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.

bioavailability

(bī′ō-ə-vā′lə-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The degree to which or rate at which a drug or other substance is absorbed or becomes available at the site of physiological activity after administration.

bi′o·a·vail′a·ble (-lə-bəl) adj.

bioavailability

[-əvā′libil′itē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + ME, availen, to serve
the degree of activity or amount of an administered drug or other substance that becomes available for activity in the target tissue.

bioavailability

The rate and extent to which a drug is available to serve as a substrate, bind to a specific molecule or participate in biochemical reactions in a target tissue after administration. For oral agents, bioavailability reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption.

Bioavailability depends on the pI (isoelectric point), the pH of a solution in which the solute does not migrate (ionic form), presence of side chains or the conformation of the epitope. Bioavailability is affected by the route of administration, rate of metabolism, lipid solubility and binding proteins. It is usually < 100% due to degradation or alteration before reaching the target tissue.

bioavailability

Clinical pharmacology The degree to which a drug is available to a target tissue after administration which, for oral drugs, reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption; BA is the in vivo presence of a substance in a form that allows it to be metabolized, serve as a substrate, bind a specific molecule, or participate in biochemical reactions. See Oral bioavailability.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that becomes available to exert a pharmacologic effect into the bloodstream.

bioavailability

The amount of a drug that reaches the blood regardless of how it is given. After intravenous injection bioavailability is 100%, but the bioavailability of drugs given by mouth is often much less, because many drugs are broken down by the digestive enzymes and many are poorly absorbed.

Bioavailability

A measure of the amount of drug that is actually absorbed from a given dose.
Mentioned in: Antiretroviral Drugs

bioavailability

physiological availability of a given amount of drug

bioavailability (bīˈ·ō··vālˈ··bilˑ·i·tē),

n the amount of or rate at which a substance or drug is accessible to the body.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
Physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency.

bioavailability

the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.
References in periodicals archive ?
14:00-14:30 Theracurmin and Theracurmin Super; The Most Advanced Form of Curcumin in Bioavailability And Efficacy in Clinical Trials by Tadashi Hashimoto, President, Theravalues Corporation
The numbers show a 185-fold higher AUC, demonstrating conclusively the superior bioavailability of the curcumin micelle compared to native curcumin.
The bioavailability of crushed ciprofloxacin is also markedly reduced when it is co-administered with enteral feed, (8) probably owing to ciprofloxacin binding to divalent cations.
Naloxone has a bioavailability of 3% when taken orally, so when a patient takes a drug like Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone in a 4:1 ratio) sublingually, "they're not having any inhibition of the mu-opioid receptor due to the naloxone.
Although Fe intake and bioavailability influenced both food intake and weight gain, relative bioavailability was similar whether based on dietary Fe concentration (mg/kg) or absolute Fe intake ([micro]g/d).
Checking blood levels of subjects after eating either cooked or raw spinach and carrots confirmed that heat releases more beta-carotene from the vegetables and increases the bioavailability of nutrients by as much as five times.
In experiments involving nonfat dry milk, mozzarella cheese, tortillas and tofu, the Illinois researchers found no increased calcium bioavailability from adding vitamin C.
a leading oral bioavailability contract research and manufacturing organization (CRO/CMO), will present, facilitate and participate in a panel discussion at ExL Pharma's 2nd annual conference focused on solubility and bioavailability in Boston, January 21 - 23, 2013.
Microplastics are ingested by organisms and the prominent concerns of this exposure include physical disruption of tissue surfaces, negative effects on digestive system processes, absorption across epithelial membranes and accumulation in internal tissues, trophic transfer in the food web and increasing the bioavailability of toxic substances (co-contaminants) that may be associated with microplastics.
Capsule technology has improved over the last 26 years, however, and we recognize that capsules designed with absorbability and bioavailability in mind can also be an effective means of nutrient delivery.
Published scientific studies report CBD oral bioavailability in the range of between 10 - 20%.
The patents have been awarded by Japanese patent office for its unique composition ratio of curcuminoids and essential oil of turmeric for enhanced oral bioavailability of curcumin.