bioastronautics


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bi·o·as·tro·nau·tics

(bī'ō-as-trō-naw'tiks),
The study of the effects of space travel and space habitation on living organisms.

bioastronautics

(bī′ō-ăs′trə-nô′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the biological and medical effects of space flight on living organisms.

bi′o·as′tro·nau′ti·cal adj.

bioastronautics

[-as′trōnôt′iks]
the science dealing with the biological aspects of space travel.

bioastronautics

(bī″ō-ăs″trō-naw′tĭks)
The study of the effects of space travel on living plants and animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
49) This idea recurred when bioastronautics requirements firmed up in 1960.
2 in the Executive Summary of The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Bioastronautics Roadmap: "How to support the extensive behavioral research program that would be necessary to validate processes or countermeasures such as select-in/select-out criteria (both for individual crew members and for a composite crew), issues related to cultural diversity, crew interactions, and isolation or stress-induced hazards.
NASA's Bioastronautics Roadmap addresses areas of risk associated with long-duration spaceflight and proposes interventions ("countermeasures") to address or overcome them (10).
The gesture-controlled kiosk is being delivered to the Johnson Space Center this week; the Bioastronautics Exhibit is scheduled to open to the public in August 2001.
For more information about the Bioastronautics Exhibit, contact Stacey Morrison at stacey.
July 1 /PRNewswire/ -- Two flight surgeons supporting Wyle and its NASA Bioastronautics Contract have been selected for the next astronaut class.
He is the senior author on two recent reports from the IOM; A Review of NASA's Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (2004) and A Review of NASA's Bioastronautics Roadmap: A Risk Reduction Strategy for Human Exploration of Space (2006).
Austin, for Compact Transcranial Doppler for Bioastronautics Research
Lisa Reed, an adjunct professor at Webster University in Space Bioastronautics, trained Collins and other crew members at the Johnson Space Center in Houston for the 1999 STS-93 mission, saying, "NASA did a good job.
Wyle is the prime contractor for NASA's Bioastronautics contract, which runs 10 years and is valued at approximately $1 billion.
Wyle has grown rapidly in the past several years through the awarding of new contracts and last year was awarded the $1 billion NASA Bioastronautics contract to provide life sciences and services to the shuttle and International Space Station.
The work is being conducted under Wyle's Bioastronautics contract where the company provides life sciences research, special-use systems and support services for NASA's human space program.