bioassay


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bioassay

 [bi″o-as´a]
determination of the active power of a drug sample by comparing its effects on a live animal or an isolated organ preparation with those of a reference standard.

bi·o·as·say

(bī'ō-as'ā),
Determination of the potency or concentration of a compound by its effect on animals, isolated tissues, or microorganisms, as compared with an analysis of its chemical or physical properties.

bioassay

/bio·as·say/ (bi´o-as″a) determination of the active power of a drug sample by comparing its effects on a live animal or an isolated organ preparation with those of a reference standard.

bioassay

(bī′ō-ăs′ā′, -ă-sā′)
n.
1. Determination of the strength or biological activity of a substance, such as a drug, by comparing its effects with those of a standard preparation on a test organism.
2. A test used to determine such strength or activity.
tr.v. bioas·sayed, bioas·saying, bioas·says
To cause to undergo a bioassay.

bioassay

[bī′ō·as′ā, -əsā′]
Etymology: Gk, bios + Fr, assayer, to try
the laboratory determination of the concentration of a drug or other substance in a specimen by comparing its effect on an organism, an animal, or an isolated tissue with that of a standard preparation. Also called biological assay.

bioassay

Lab medicine
Any quantification procedure to detect:
(1) The activity or potency—functional or effective—amount of a substance—e.g., antibiotic, chemical, drug, hormone, metabolit, vitamin, etc.—in a biological fluid;
(2) Toxicity of a substance (e.g., a pollutant) or organism (e.g., a pathogen) of interest in an in vivo system, i.e., in a cell or animal; in bioassays, the effect is tested on living cells or organisms.
 
Molecular biology
An assay that uses a living system, such as an intact cell, to measure an effect or a molecule of interest.
 
Radiation physics
A determination of the quantity of radioactive material in the human body, either by direct measurement—in vivo counting—or by analysis of excreta.

bi·o·as·say

(bī'ō-as'ā)
Determination of the potency or concentration of a compound by its effect on animals, isolated tissues, or microorganisms, as contrasted with analysis of its chemical or physical properties.
Synonym(s): biologic assay, biotest.

bioassay

A method of measuring the potency of a drug or other biochemical agent by comparing its effects on animals with those of known preparations of standard strength.

bioassay

determination of the active power of a drug sample by comparing its effects on a live animal or an isolated organ preparation with those of a reference standard.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finding either a Bt toxin or any other toxin active against RDel, prospects should be subjected to extensive screening programs, where test individuals are exposed to a number of different toxic agents, under controlled bioassay conditions.
at different concentrations using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay.
We compared the results obtained by the yeast bioassay with results obtained by commercial androgen enzyme immunoassays.
The bioassay involves collecting two groups of bees with mites and ushering them into glass canning jars capped with fine-mesh lids.
The complexity of allelopathic interactions complicates the choice of an appropriate bioassay (Romeo & Weidenhamer, 1999); as a result, few bioassays have adequately addressed the separation of allelopathic interactions from other plant-plant interactions (Elakovich, 1999).
Cancer assessments are based primarily on bioassays, but these bioassays are flawed because effects on animals do not equal effects on man and vice versa, and effects of large doses over short time spans are not the same as low doses over long time spans, he said.
For example, while an in vitro assay might detect only chemicals that act through the estrogen receptor, an in vivo bioassay detects chemicals that act through a variety of the mechanisms that affect the reproductive system.
This (Department of the Interior) research involves five areas: (1) continued development of the SPMD technique for integrative sampling of hydrophobic chemicals; (2) evaluation of a deployment apparatus for use with SPMD samplers; (3) continued development of an integrative sampling approach for toxic metals, and initiation of the development of an integrative sampler for volatile metals, specifically mercury vapor; (4) initiation of development of an integrative sampling approach for more hydrophilic chemicals; and (5) evaluation of extracts from standard SPMDs deployed in the field, using a variety of bioassay procedures to determine the applicability of incorporating the SPMD sampling technique into exposure assessment paradigms.
Conventional bioassay techniques often take hours or days.
The assay is ADCC mechanism of action (MOA)-based and features frozen, thaw-and-use effector cells, and optimized reagents and protocol to perform a reporter-based ADCC bioassay in a single day.
SGS in Malaysia has established two new services to assist the agricultural industry a bioassay testing service for insects and, together with logistic partners, a shipping service for sending insect samples to laboratories in the USA.