bioassay


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bioassay

 [bi″o-as´a]
determination of the active power of a drug sample by comparing its effects on a live animal or an isolated organ preparation with those of a reference standard.

bi·o·as·say

(bī'ō-as'ā),
Determination of the potency or concentration of a compound by its effect on animals, isolated tissues, or microorganisms, as compared with an analysis of its chemical or physical properties.

bioassay

/bio·as·say/ (bi´o-as″a) determination of the active power of a drug sample by comparing its effects on a live animal or an isolated organ preparation with those of a reference standard.

bioassay

(bī′ō-ăs′ā′, -ă-sā′)
n.
1. Determination of the strength or biological activity of a substance, such as a drug, by comparing its effects with those of a standard preparation on a test organism.
2. A test used to determine such strength or activity.
tr.v. bioas·sayed, bioas·saying, bioas·says
To cause to undergo a bioassay.

bioassay

[bī′ō·as′ā, -əsā′]
Etymology: Gk, bios + Fr, assayer, to try
the laboratory determination of the concentration of a drug or other substance in a specimen by comparing its effect on an organism, an animal, or an isolated tissue with that of a standard preparation. Also called biological assay.

bioassay

Lab medicine
Any quantification procedure to detect:
(1) The activity or potency—functional or effective—amount of a substance—e.g., antibiotic, chemical, drug, hormone, metabolit, vitamin, etc.—in a biological fluid;
(2) Toxicity of a substance (e.g., a pollutant) or organism (e.g., a pathogen) of interest in an in vivo system, i.e., in a cell or animal; in bioassays, the effect is tested on living cells or organisms.
 
Molecular biology
An assay that uses a living system, such as an intact cell, to measure an effect or a molecule of interest.
 
Radiation physics
A determination of the quantity of radioactive material in the human body, either by direct measurement—in vivo counting—or by analysis of excreta.

bi·o·as·say

(bī'ō-as'ā)
Determination of the potency or concentration of a compound by its effect on animals, isolated tissues, or microorganisms, as contrasted with analysis of its chemical or physical properties.
Synonym(s): biologic assay, biotest.

bioassay

A method of measuring the potency of a drug or other biochemical agent by comparing its effects on animals with those of known preparations of standard strength.

bioassay

determination of the active power of a drug sample by comparing its effects on a live animal or an isolated organ preparation with those of a reference standard.
References in periodicals archive ?
What other technologies can be brought in as a future bioassay platform?
frugiperda larvae that consumed mixtures of spinosad and SfMNPV in semi-synthetic diet bioassays had a significant increase in mortality compared with insects that consumed either of these 2 components alone.
Vacuum oven-drying was used to artificially weather the test specimens as described in the termite bioassay.
After each decontamination, the plates were allowed to dry for 48 hours before the insect bioassay was performed.
In the time it takes a scientist to manually measure one bioassay plate, AutoZONE enables a laboratory to analyse 25 plates and produce extremely accurate results.
Comparison of the mouse bioassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedures for the detection of type A botulinal toxin in food.
The brine shrimp lethality bioassay was carried out according to McLaughlin et al.
The bioassay procedure was as follows: a 2-mL overnight culture was used to inoculate 18 mL of fresh selective sc medium.
This bioassay has been successfully used to isolate fractions enriched in potential cancer chemopreventive agents in table beets, green beans, green onion, soybeans, oats and cranberry fruit.
Current methods are labor-intensive affairs performed by laboratory technicians using specialized equipment, says Pettis, whose bioassay approach will appear in the American Bee Journal.
In a follow-up experiment we will use our bioassay to test a known aquatic toxicant (atrazine).
The objectives of this review are to discuss some of the key methodological obstacles in designing and selecting an appropriate screening bioassay and some of the most commonly used screening bioassays for assessing allelopathic potential in crop germplasm.