bioaccumulation

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bioaccumulation

(bī′ō-ə-kyo͞om′yə-lā′shən)
n.
The accumulation of a substance, such as a toxic chemical, in various tissues of a living organism: the bioaccumulation of mercury in fish.

bi′o·ac·cu′mu·la′tive adj.

bioaccumulation

The accumulation of chemicals or nutrients in a living organism against an inorganic background (e.g., the external environment), which is due to a high partition coefficient and resistance to degradation by the bioaccumulating organism.

bioaccumulation

the process of concentration of chemical contaminents in animal tissues as they move higher up the food chain e.g. pesticides and heavy metals stored in fatty tissues are passed on from one predator to a higher predator, the resulting concentrations being increasingly harmful and most so to the top predators.

bioaccumulation

process producing an increase in the concentration of chemicals (usually toxins) in the tissues of organisms with each increase in the trophic level in the food chain. Examples include chlorinated hydrocarbons which reach their greatest concentrations in predatory birds and pelicans, and ciguatera in which the toxins are concentrated in large predatory fish such as gropers, barracudas and mackerel.
References in periodicals archive ?
The database has > 160,000 records of persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic substances data.
Many information gaps currently exist with regard to what is found in human and wildlife tissues, more so for developing countries and countries with economies in transition and for chemicals that are less bioaccumulative in the body.
But overall we would like them not to be used at all in anti-fouling paints because by definition they are toxic, while they can also be persistent and bioaccumulative in the environment.
Exposure to the persistent, bioaccumulative flame retardant decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE) has been linked to developmental health effects, and the compound is scheduled to be phased out of production by December 2013.
Existing laws do not give our government the authority to protect us from such chemicals, even when we know they are persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic," explains Ted Schettler, MD, MPH, with Science & Environmental Health Network.
Collins presented information on persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic substances and highlighted the link between sustainability and ethics.
Dioxins are bioaccumulative and can cause cancer, birth defects and organ failure.
According to the independent group OMBWatch, the EPA rule rewrite would: "move from the current annual reporting requirement to every other year reporting for all facilities, eliminating half of all TRI data; allow companies to release ten times as much pollution before being required to report the details of how much toxic pollution was produced and where it went; and permit facilities to withhold information on low-level production of persistent bioaccumulative toxins (PBTs), including lead and mercury, which are dangerous even in very small quantities because they are toxic, persist in the environment, and build up in people's bodies.
According to OMBWatch, the EPA rule changes would: "move from the current annual reporting requirement to every other year reporting for all facilities, eliminating half of all TRI data; allow companies to release ten times as much pollution before being required to report the details of how much toxic pollution was produced and where it went; and permit facilities to withhold information on low-level production of persistent bioaccumulative toxins (PBTs), including lead and mercury, which are dangerous even in very small quantities because they are toxic, persist in the environment, and build up in people's bodies.
Anaerobic bacteria living in these sediments could convert this mercury to its more bioaccumulative and toxic form, methylmercury.
The melting of glacial ice that formed in the middle of the twentieth century may be a source of a cocktail of persistent, bioaccumulative toxic substances that can threaten human health and the environment, according to a study by Christian Bogdal, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, and colleagues in the 1 November 2009 issue of Environmental Science & Technology.