bioaccumulate

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bioaccumulate

(bī-ō-ă-kyū'myū-lāt),
Accumulation of environmental chemicals in tissues of exposed organisms.
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Because of their large fat deposits and position at the top of the marine food chain, Shaw points out, "all marine mammals are bioaccumulating large quantities of environmental pollutants.
A particular focus is put on fish consumption, because fish are a major route of exposure to bioaccumulating contaminants (Turyk et al.
In other parks, phthalates typically used in the production of paper cups and Styrofoam containers were bioaccumulating in fish.
If natural products are bioaccumulating in the same manner as industrial compounds, Teuten noted, then some marine animals have been exposed to these natural chemicals for many years.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to expand the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program to include reporting on bioaccumulating chemicals such as mercury, and for the industry and EPA to work cooperatively to develop improved toxics assessment methods.
The fact that dust can be a source of exposure to flame retardants was first revealed by investigations into why compounds associated with polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants were bioaccumulating in people's bodies.
These lists include Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) chemicals reportable to the EPA, as well as bioaccumulating substances and air and water pollutants.
This approach is most effective for persistent, bioaccumulating toxicants such as the PBDEs.
The long-lived, late-maturing, and benthic lifestyle of sturgeon may make them particularly susceptible to the actions of persistent bioaccumulating pollutants (DeVore et al.
1998), and the bioaccumulating DDT metabolite p,p'-DDE (dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene), the fungicides vinclozolin, procymidone, and prochloraz, and the herbicide linuron (Cook et al.
This shows that pollution levels in the ocean are at such a bad level that even filter feeders are bioaccumulating some kinds of contaminants," says Frank Cipriano, director of the Conservation Genetics Laboratory at San Francisco State University.
Exogenous compounds that have been investigated for endocrine-related activity include bioaccumulating and nonbioaccumulating contaminants, but represent only a fraction of xenobiotics with potential endocrine-disrupting properties that are present in the environment.