biowarfare

(redirected from bio-warfare)
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Related to bio-warfare: Bioweapons

bi·o·war·fare

(bī'ō-wōr'fār)
1. The use of living organisms (e.g., bacteria, viruses, or fungi) or their products (e.g., toxins) in warfare.
2. A common but incorrect designation for the use of chemical or radiologic agents in warfare.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tashjian's assertions that the state has done little to prepare for bio-warfare in the wake of the Sept.
The company, which makes products that detect biological weapons, is likely to announce record sales from its bio-warfare arm as fears about terrorism remain high.
But school security experts and administrators across the country agree that as the demands of school security increase by the week, with fears of terrorism, bio-warfare and other attacks, technology is only one of the three main ingredients needed to create the safest schools possible.
While no sane American relishes the thought of an Iraqi regime armed with nuclear or bio-warfare weapons, the question patriotic Americans must confront is this: Are we willing to send our nation's sons to kill and die on behalf of UN disarmament decrees, which would eventually apply to our own country as well?
Weaponized spores are so small, "10,000 of them are like a speck of dust," says bio-warfare expert Jonathan Tucker at the Monterey Institute of International Studies in Washington, D.
The Sunday Express reported in April that a routine audit in the UK Government's bio-warfare research laboratory at Porton Down, Wiltshire, revealed that a container of foot and mouth virus was missing two months before the first official outbreak.
Dr Aileen Marty delivered a lecture on the future of bio-warfare and bio-terrorism to students and staff at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine.
A dilemma is how to study the threats of bio-warfare in detail and develop vaccines and other countermeasures, while maintaining the policy of abhorrence at the idea of using disease as a weapon.
Dr Vogel reported that scientists formerly employed by the Soviet bio-warfare programme had been offered lucrative jobs in countries categorised by the US State Department as supporting international terrorism.
However, anthrax spores -- another popular bio-warfare agent the U.
Del-Immune represents the culmination of 50 years of research originated by Cold War-era Soviet Bloc scientists and Russian military bio-warfare troop protection programs.
Paul McKellips' third novel, BOX 731, is a provocative, globe-racing bio-warfare thriller entangling readers in a complex Russian-Syrian terrorism plot