binocular

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binocular

 [bin-ok´u-ler]
1. pertaining to both eyes.
2. having two eyepieces, as in a microscope.

bin·oc·u·lar

(bin-ok'yū-lăr),
Adapted to the use of both eyes; said of an optic instrument.
[L. bini, paired, + oculus, eye]

binocular

/bin·oc·u·lar/ (bĭ-nok´u-ler)
1. pertaining to both eyes.
2. having two eyepieces, as in a microscope.

binocular

(bə-nŏk′yə-lər, bī-)
adj.
1. Relating to, used by, or involving both eyes at the same time: binocular vision.
2. Having two eyes arranged to produce stereoscopic vision.

bin·oc′u·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.
bin·oc′u·lar·ly adv.

binocular

[bīnok′yələr, bin-]
Etymology: L, bini + oculus, eye
1 pertaining to both eyes, especially regarding vision.
2 a microscope, telescope, or field glass that can accommodate viewing by both eyes.

binocular

adjective Referring to 2 eyes; using 2 eyes at once—e.g., binocular vision; adapted for 2 eyes, as in a binocular microscope.

noun A binocular glass—e.g., opera glass, microscope, binoculars.

bin·oc·u·lar

(bin-ok'yū-lăr)
Adapted to the use of both eyes; said of an optic instrument.
[L. bini, paired, + oculus, eye]

binocular

Pertaining to both eyes or to the simultaneous use of both eyes.

binocular

pertaining to the use of both eyes as in stereoscopic vision.

Binocular

Both eyes accurately pointing to the same object.
Mentioned in: Vision Training

binocular 

Pertaining to both eyes.

binocular 

Pertaining to the use of the two eyes but without fusion or stereopsis. The term is primarily used in clinical testing and vision therapy in which different prisms are placed in front of each eye.

binocular

1. pertaining to both eyes.
2. having two eyepieces, as in a microscope.

binocular field
the field of vision, simultaneously received by both eyes. Varies between animal species, depending on the placement of the eyes in the skull. Widest in the cat (90°), 60-70° in the horse and 15° in poultry.
Enlarge picture
Field of vision of predatory animals. By permission from Aspinall V, O'Reilly M, Introduction to Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology, Butterworth Heinemann, 2004
References in periodicals archive ?
The binocular field of fixation shows the area of eye movement in which bifoveal binocular viewing is maintained.
Which of the following best describes the binocular field of fixation?
In addition there should be no significant field defect in the binocular field which encroaches within 20[degrees] of fixation either above or below the horizontal meridian.