bimodal

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bi·mod·al

(bī-mō'dăl),
Denoting a frequency curve characterized by two peaks.

bimodal

(bī″mō′dăl) [ bi- + modal]
1. Pert. to a graphic presentation that contains two peaks.
2. Pert. to a set of data that has two distinct maximum values.
References in periodicals archive ?
Number 41 Lorito-Lorito (Peru) explores bimodality.
The identity is another structural relation and its role is important in the distribution theory because it provides a magnet for an alternative centering, pulling consistent estimators like IV and LIML away from the relevant parameter in the behavioral relation and thereby naturally inducing a bimodality.
This bimodality explains why products such as adequate housing, and health care are usually undersupplied in even developed countries.
If the proportion of individuals cannibalized during a given time period is increased, the bimodality of the data is made more prominent and it persists longer.
However, the degrees of increase on the activity of each catalyst were different, indicating that the amount of hydrogen should be carefully tuned to achieve clear bimodality.
This bimodality is reported for the first time and characterizes the sintering behavior of blends of polymers with distinctly different melting points, like the ones under consideration.
Bimodality in size distributions: the red sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus franciscanus) as an example.
5 [micro]m, with no sign of bimodality in this case, as shown in Fig.
Correlations between the molecular structure and the rheological behavior have been analyzed in order to clarify the effect of molecular weight distribution and the bimodality for well-defined substances, like blends of polystyrenes and polybutadienes, respectively, with narrow molecular weight distributions [33-38].
Using this procedure, they did not resolve the bimodality, and surmised that the transform of viscosity to MWD was likely to be ambiguous.
It is speculated that the effect of the bimodality of the molecular weight distribution (that is represented by a broader relaxation spectrum in Figure 3) is more effective for the MDO process than the molecular weight by itself.