gold standard

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gold stan·dard

the term criterion standard is preferred in medical writing.
Term used to describe a method or procedure that is widely recognized as the best available.
[jargon]

gold standard

1 an accepted test that is assumed to be able to determine the true disease state of a patient regardless of positive or negative test findings or sensitivities or specificities of other diagnostic tests used.
2 an acknowledged measure of comparison of the superior effectiveness or value of a particular medication or other therapy as compared with that of other drugs or treatments.
Any standardised clinical assessment, method, procedure, intervention or measurement of known validity and reliability which is generally taken to be the best available, against which new tests or results and protocols are compared

gold standard

Criterion standard The best or most successful diagnostic or therapeutic modality for a condition, against which new tests or results and protocols are compared. See Standard of practice, Practice guidelines.

gold stan·dard

(gōld stan'dărd)
Jargonistic term meaning ideal or basic measurement; usage best avoided.
[jargon]

gold

a chemical element, atomic number 79, atomic weight 196.967, symbol Au. See Table 6. Gold and many of its compounds are used in human medicine and occasionally in veterinary medicine. See also chrysotherapy.

gold-198
a radioisotope of gold having a half-life of 2.7 days and emitting gamma and beta radiation. Symbol 198Au.
gold colloid scintiscan
gold dust
a disease of aquarium fish caused by the flagellate protozoon Oodinium limnecicum. Affected fish develop a varnished look caused by a very heavy infestation of the protozoa on the skin and die within a few days.
gold standard
the ultimate standard to which all endeavors aspire.
References in periodicals archive ?
In those years, many attempts to institutionalize bimetallism happened, shaking the confidence in the U.
Bimetallism faded with the vast expansion of gold supplies and the agricultural boom just after the turn of the century.
Martin, 1973, "1853: The End of Bimetallism in the United States," Journal of Economic History 33.
The phrase referred to the change in the United States' monetary system from bimetallism, in which gold and silver are used concurrently, to the gold standard.
The gold standard arose out of bimetallism in the 1870s, after silver had been effectively demonetised in major countries and no country was willing or able to maintain the bimetallic ratio.
With the growing size of participating states and the transformation of money, thanks to the end of bimetallism and the wider use of bank notes and deposits, the objectives and the practical management of monetary unions became more complex and more political.
Hence the drive to restore the dollar to its pre-war parity with gold may have entailed more deflation than would have been expected from o resumption of bimetallism which, presumably, would have meant more rapid money supply growth (see Friedman, 1990).
18 Gould, 241, describes how bimetallism produced a situation in which "given monetary authority got out of step" with the market.
Here events and ideas are seen in juxtaposition, gold monometallism, bimetallism, indexation, managed money, and central banking making an appearance, along with some additional writers, most notably Leon Walras and Francis Ysidro Edgeworth; Edgeworth and his 1888 article "The Mathematical Theory of Banking" are singled out for special attention.
In 1816, England officially abandoned bimetallism and made silver coins into tokens that were only limited legal tender.
The United States formally adopted the gold standard only in 1879--a move intended essentially to revert to the status quo ante bellum, but with the importance difference that the new system was a de jure gold standard and not a bimetallism that functioned de facto as a gold standard.
Although not immediately noticed, the list omitted the silver dollar, effectively ending the period of de jure bimetallism that had been initiated by Alexander Hamilton three-quarters of a century earlier; full resumption of the gold standard happened by January 1, 1879.