bilabial


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bilabial

[bī·lā′bē·əl]
a consonantal speech sound produced by using the two lips, such as b, p, or m. Also called labial.

bi·la·bi·al

(bī-lā'bē-ăl)
1. Pertaining to both lips.
2. Speech sounds formed by contact or controlled airflow between the two lips, as in the sounds /b/ and /p/.
[bi + L. labium, lip]
References in periodicals archive ?
In Chhatthare Limbu, bilabial, voiced stop /b/ shows contrast with its voiceless counterpart /p/ in an identical environment only in a limited number of occurrences, van Driem (1987:11) establishes /b/ as a phoneme on the basis of contrast in one minimal pair lap 'wing' and lab 'moon' in Phedappe dialect of Limbu.
Both "v" and "f" are letters/sounds made by the lips, thus called (interchangeable) bilabials.
which are not phonemically distinct) in many cases can be shown to come from an earlier bilabial, *p or *b.
The third person non-singular agent prefix is <-m> if it is followed by a bilabial consonant as in (34).
The two voiced bilabial consonants, " mem" and " bet," are sometimes interchanged, but not frequently.
There are also some riddles which we cannot solve, such as the existence of some bilabial stops with r- in Gilgiti: prik 'jump', (3) proono 'old' (compare Kohistani poono); bri'w 'rice paddy' (compare Kohistani byu).
In Luick's interpretation this change in all probability constituted "a change from a voiced bilabial spirant, indicated by b, to a voiced labiodental spirant, indicated by f .
12) Native speakers know that the voiced bilabial stop [b] in the initial position cannot be immediately followed by the velar nasal stop [n], though they are unlikely to be able to state this information in a rule.
For Toqabaqita, orthographic f represents a voiceless bilabial fricative, gw a voiced labial-velar stop, kw a voiceless labialvelar stop, ng a velar nasal, q a glottal stop, r an apical trill, and th a voiceless interdental fricative.
Liquid "l," alveolar sonorant, flowing into bilabial voiced stop "b," and forming eventually into labiodental voiceless spirant "f," the word sounds the rhythm by which the world ceaselessly hums.
The bilabial consonants m, b, and p, for example, were all treated as the same sound.
As expected, the sounds that are articulated at the front of the oral cavity--the bilabial (/p/, /b/), dental and alveolar (/d/, /t/, /th/), and fricative (/s/) sounds--were mispronounced, albeit inconsistently.