biguanide


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Related to biguanide: metformin

biguanide

(bī-gwŏn′īd″)
A member of the class of oral antihyperglycemic agents that works by limiting glucose production and glucose absorption, and by increasing the body's sensitivity to insulin. Glucophage is one member of this drug class.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biguanides also decrease hepatic metabolism of lactate and have a negative ionotropic effect on the heart, both of which elevate lactate levels (11).
Biguanides may increase the risk of lactic acidosis in patients with a history of alcoholism, liver disease, renal disease, pregnancy and lactation and CHF or patients with CV disease and chronic cardiopulmonary disease.
Dimethyl biguanide hydrochloride chemistry is simple and can be produced at 95%+ yield in a single step followed by continuous crystallization and drying.
Metformin (Glucophage[R]), a biguanide, is the only drug in this class currently approved for use in the United States.
Metformin is a biguanide antiglycaemic agent which lowers blood glucose by decreasing gastrointestinal absorption, decreasing gluconeogenesis and increasing peripheral utilisation of glucose (1).
The biguanide Glucophage (metformin), is one of the most widely prescribed antihyperglycemic agents which improves glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes.
Almost 39% (n = 62 717) of the "combination therapy" prescriptions were for a sulfonylurea in combination with a biguanide plus at least one other antidiabetic product.
Pools and spas are a relatively mature market for specialty biocides, as consumers were quick to gravitate to the safe and easy-to-use powders, tablets and pellets containing chlorinated isocyanurates, brominated hydantoins and other active ingredients such as polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB).
To the Editor: Metformin, a biguanide antidiabetic drug, has been implicated as a cause of lactic acidosis, usually in a setting of renal failure, IV contrast administration, shock, sepsis, hypoxemia, heart failure, or liver disease.
What is our justification for instructing people managed with diet alone and/or biguanide (metformin) therapy, with adequate glycaemic control to keep testing regularly, and what is the evidence for this?