bicarbonate

(redirected from bicarbonate buffering)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bicarbonate

 [bi-kahr´bon-āt]
any salt containing the HCO3 anion.
blood bicarbonate (plasma bicarbonate) the bicarbonate of the blood plasma, an important parameter of acid-base balance measured in blood gas analysis.
bicarbonate of soda sodium bicarbonate.

bi·car·bon·ate

(bī-kar'bon-āt),
HCO3-; the ion remaining after the first dissociation of carbonic acid; a central buffering agent in blood.

bicarbonate

/bi·car·bo·nate/ (-kahr´bah-nāt) any salt containing the HCO3− anion.
blood bicarbonate , plasma bicarbonate the bicarbonate of the blood plasma, an index of alkali reserve.
bicarbonate of soda  sodium bicarbonate.
standard bicarbonate  the plasma bicarbonate concentration in blood equilibrated with a specific gas mixture under specific conditions.

bicarbonate (HCO3-)

[bīkär′bənāt]
Etymology: L, bis, twice, carbo, coal
an anion of carbonic acid in which only one of the hydrogen atoms has been removed, as in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). Also called hydrogen carbonate.

bicarbonate

A salt containing the anion HCO3-, which is the most important buffer in the blood, it is regulated by the kidney, which excretes it in excess and retains it when needed; it increases with ingestion of excess anti-acids, diuretics and steroids; it is decreased with diarrhoea, liver disease, renal disease and chemical poisoning.

Specimen
Bicarbonate is usually measured in serum as total CO2.
 
Ref range
24–26 Meq/L.

bicarbonate

HCO3 Nephrology A general term for any salt containing the anion HCO3–, which is the most important buffer in the blood; bicarbonate is regulated by the kidney, which excretes it in excess and retains it when needed; it is ↑ in ingestion of excess antiacids, diuretics, steroids; it is ↓ in diarrhea, liver disease, renal disease, chemical poisoning. See Blood gases.

bi·car·bon·ate

(bī-kahr'bŏn-āt)
The ion remaining after the first dissociation of carbonic acid; a central buffering agent in blood.

bicarbonate

usually refers to sodium bicarbonate (as in 'bicarbonate of soda' or 'baking soda'). In the body it is one of the most important extracellular buffers, and the bicarbonate level is an indirect measure of the acidity of the blood. The normal range for serum bicarbonate is 22-30 mmol.L-1. In sport, bicarbonate supplementation is used to enhance performance in athletic events conducted at near-maximum intensity for 1-7 minutes (400-1500 m running, 100-400 m swimming, kayaking, rowing and canoeing) as they may otherwise be limited by excess hydrogen ion accumulation. See also ergogenic aids; appendix 4.4 .

acidosis

pathophysical disorder characterized by hydrogen (H+) ion increase or base (OH-) loss, so that the tissue pH can no longer be maintained at 7.4
  • metabolic acidosis acidosis caused by ketone body accumulation; characterized by diarrhoea, vomiting and dehydration and hyperventilation (Kussmaul respiration/air hunger)


alkalosis

pathophysical disorder characterized by hydrogen (H+) ion loss or base (OH-) excess, so that the tissue pH can no longer be maintained at 7.4

bi·car·bon·ate

(bī-kahr'bŏn-āt)
Ion remaining after first dissociation of carbonic acid; central buffering agent in blood.

bicarbonate,

n a salt resulting from the incomplete neutralization of carbonic acid such as from passing excess carbon dioxide into a base solution.

bicarbonate

any salt containing the HCO3 anion.

blood bicarbonate
the bicarbonate of the blood plasma, an important parameter of acid-base balance measured in blood gas analysis. Called also plasma bicarbonate.
bicarbonate buffering
major body buffering system in acid-base balance.
plasma bicarbonate
see blood bicarbonate (above).
bicarbonate of soda
sodium bicarbonate.