bicameral

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bicameral

 [bi-kam´er-al]
having two chambers or cavities.

bi·cam·er·al

(bī-kam'er-ăl),
Having two chambers; denoting especially an abscess divided by a more or less complete septum.
[bi- + L. camera, chamber]

bicameral

/bi·cam·er·al/ (bi-kam´er-al) having two chambers or cavities.

bicameral

(bī-kăm′ər-əl)
adj.
Medicine Composed of or having two chambers, as an abscess divided by a septum.

bi·cam′er·al·ism n.

bicameral

[bī·kam′ər·əl]
Etymology: L, bis, twice + camera, vaulted chamber
having two chambers.

bi·cam·er·al

(bī-kam'ĕr-ăl)
Having two chambers; denoting especially an abscess divided by a more or less complete septum.
[bi- + L. camera, chamber]

bi·cam·er·al

(bī-kam'ĕr-ăl)
Having two cham-bers; denoting especially an abscess divided by a more or less complete septum.
[bi- + L. camera, chamber]

bicameral

having two chambers or cavities.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, defenders of bicameralism usually argue that the advantage of an upper house is that it "slows down the legislative process, renders abrupt change difficult, forces myopic legislators to have second thoughts, and thereby minimizes arbitrariness and injustice in governmental action.
417 (1998) (overturning the Line Item Veto as an unconstitutional violation of the process bicameralism and presentment that granted to the President legislative power rightly residing in the Congress); Bowsher v.
One should first be reminded of the recent jurisprudence of the Constitutional Court in the sense of traditions of Romanian parliamentarism (Gutan, 2013) that consecrates bicameralism and the advantages of this structure to the legislative.
Certain political institutions are relevant for how dominant the state becomes: in particular, majoritarian electoral systems and bicameralism seem negatively related to the size of government and the welfare state; presidentialism sometimes stands in such a relationship to the government variables as well.
Attributing the attachment to bicameralism to the genius of the people comes close to the mark, since there is good reason to believe--contrary to the supposition that Americans sought to "copy" the British model--it naturally evolved over time.
Because the use of the deem-and-pass maneuver significantly diminishes accountability and transparency, and also undermines the importance of the bicameralism requirement, the practice should not be used to advance multiple separate bills through a single floor vote.
The most frequently occurring category (363 objections) relates to the president's theory of a unitary executive branch (article II vests the president with executive power and the duty to faithfully execute the law); the second most frequently occurring category includes 235 objections relating to the bicameralism and presentment clause, the centerpiece of the 1983 Supreme Court case Immigration and Naturalization Service v.
869 (2011) (arguing that the veto gates of bicameralism and presentment make it very unlikely that Congress will strip away jurisdiction, and that they hence provide "structural safeguards" to Article III jurisdiction).
Restraining the exercise of such authority, whether by adopting rules for the exercise of regulatory authority (as under the Administrative Procedure Act or the Congressional Review Act) or limiting the scope of such authority, is perfectly acceptable so long as other constitutional requirements (such as bicameralism and presentment) are satisfied.
Levinson and the other authors are all more or less critical of bicameralism, the presidential veto, and judicial review; the analysis of these institutions is what makes these books especially interesting though sometimes wrongheaded.
He underlined that Morocco has opted, since independence, for partisan pluralism and market-oriented economy, stressing the characteristics of bicameralism and the main aspects of the constitutional reform, announced by HM the King in his speech of March 9.