bibliomania


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bib·li·o·ma·ni·a

(bib'lē-ō-mā'nē-ă),
Morbidly intense desire to collect and possess books, especially rare books.
[G. biblion, book, + mania, frenzy]

bibliomania

A morbid preoccupation for acquiring books.

bibliomania

(bĭb″lē-ō-mā′nē-ă) [Gr. biblion, book, + mania, madness]
An obsession with the collecting of books.
References in periodicals archive ?
51) But they intensified in the rapidly expanding book culture of the early nineteenth century, which threw up well-publicized phenomena such as bibliomania, obsessive book collection and book production (not to mention "indefatigable" book readers such as D'Israeli himself), conjuring up the nightmare scenario of an infinite regress not just of books but of books that referred only to other books: "books made of other books and those again of others, without end.
Perhaps the most agreeable facet of bibliomania is serendipity, the happy discovery of unlooked for treasures.
If there were such a thing as an effluvium of bibliomania, someone brought up in the suburbs of Ferguson, Sir William Dixson and Dr Leslie Cowlishaw (3) could be thought to be dangerously--and deliciously--exposed to it.
I'm a poor man with an expensive taste for rare books, a gentleman of lean purse, as a writer of an earlier century would put it, and a bibliophile rapidly on the path to bibliomania and moral decay.
She dips into the history of bibliomania and provides vignettes of other characters, but mostly the book is an account of two men and the author's experiences in getting to know them.
EDITOR'S PICK: An unassuming storefront hides the treasures within Bibliomania (closed Sun;.
A riveting, lurid account of the author's first tremulous encounters with 'book lust' and his helpless descent into full-blown bibliomania.
Many of the themes--magnificence, bibliomania, the culture of commodities, and conspicuous consumption--already appeared in Lisa Jardine's Worldly Goods: A New History of the Renaissance (1996), a book that has been criticized for overemphasizing the role of the market in creating high culture and undervaluing visual rhetoric and the hermeneutical tradition.
Paul's madness is not manifested through psychosis like that of Andrew's, but through complete emotional detachment and bibliomania.