bibliographical

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bibliographic

adjective Referring to a bibliography, or the history of books.

bibliographical

pertaining to the literature of a subject.

bibliographical tools
the ways in which a bibliography can be approached or managed. These include current literature scans, article indexes, compilations of abstracts, lists of current contents, abstracting journals, lists of titles, subject reviews, bibliographies, lists of headings, lists of headwords and synonyms, computerized databases and thesauruses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, Erne's study is throughout enriched by the work of a new generation of bibliographically inclined scholars, including, in addition to Farmer and Lesser, Sonia Massai, Adam Hooks, and Tiffany Stern.
Directly addressing the relative scope of the collection would make this book bibliographically more useful.
reader-conflation is bibliographically questionable is less relevant to
His methods (careful historicism, bibliographically informed close reading, well-turned prose) are traditional in the best sense, but his points are groundbreaking: far from being cashiered by the steam press (the myth of "Print Culture's Promethean Dawn" [p.
Seen as a regulative idea, the "work" retains its function as a pragmatic agreement for organizing our remembered experiences of reading documents that are closely related bibliographically and for delimiting the relevance of documents being investigated for their relevance to an editing project: for an edition of the "work.
While the most common surviving sixteenth-century books are very common indeed--for some we have registered over one hundred surviving copies--more than half of the 52,000 bibliographically distinct items registered in our bibliography French Vernacular Books survive in fewer than four copies.
Thus the content and concerns of the volume define it as far more than the sum of its parts, but the book short-changes itself by behaving, bibliographically, very much like a traditional anthology.
Bibliographically, Neville is in control of the primary sources as well as the modern scholarship.
This is not an early modern studies I recognize, however much it might once have, textually, bibliographically, and theoretically, described the Renaissance.
It was not until 1951, with the publication of Peter Alexander's bibliographically much more advanced one-volume edition that the Globe began to be displaced.

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