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bias

 [bi´as]
1. (in a measurement process) systematic error.
2. any influence or action at any stage of a study that systematically distorts the findings.
3. (of a statistical estimator) the difference between the expected value of the estimator and the true parameter value.

bi·as

(bī'-as),
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

There is no imputation of prejudice, partisanship, or other subjective or emotional factor such as an investigator's desire to achieve a particular outcome. More than 100 varieties of bias have been described, but all fall into a small number of classes: 1. Systematic one-sided variation of measurements from the true value. SYN systematic error, instrumental error 2. Variation of statistical summary measures (means, rates, measures of association) from their true values as a result of systematic variation of measurements, other flaws in data collection, or flaws in study design or analysis. 3. Deviation of inferences from the truth as a result of flaws in study design, data collection, or the analysis or interpretation of results. 4. A tendency of procedures in study design, data collection, analysis, interpretation, review or publication, to yield results or conclusions that depart from the truth. 5. Prejudice leading to the conscious or subconscious selection of study procedures that depart from the truth in a particular direction, or to one-sidedness in interpretation of results. This last form of bias can arise as a result of shoddy scientific methods or deliberate misrepresentation of the truth by investigators.

bias

[bī′əs]
Etymology: MFr, biais
1 an oblique or a diagonal line.
2 a prejudiced or subjective attitude.
3 (in statistics) the distortion of statistical findings from the true value. There can be many kinds of bias; some may be caused by the sampling process, but bias can be caused by other factors.
4 (in electronics) a voltage applied to an electronic device, such as a vacuum tube or a transistor, to control operating limits. See also detection bias.

bias

Epidemiology Deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such systematic deviation; any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that are systematically incorrect

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review, which can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

bias,

n in statistics, the systematic distortion of a statistic caused by a particular sampling process.

bias

any systematic error in the design, conduct or analysis of a study which results in estimates which depart from true values. An unbiased study is free from systematic error. Many types of bias have been named, but three general types can be identified, selection bias, information bias and confounding. Selection bias is a systematic error in a study caused by the individuals selected into the study being different from the entire target population in an important way. See also berkson's bias. Information bias is a systematic error in a study caused by errors in the data which are collected in the study, or in the analysis of the data.
References in periodicals archive ?
He points to three categories of content analysis as a method examining media bias: first, examining "volumetric" biases that are concerned with the amount of coverage; second, assessing the valence or tone of the coverage; and, third, assessing a "selection" bias of one party or candidate over another in campaign stories (pp.
In summary, I suggest that coaches pay more attention to the tendencies mentioned above, become more aware of them, and critically develop training strategies to account for these intrinsic biases.
Biases aren't inherently bad, but some may lead us in the wrong direction.
Previously identified biases can be grouped into four main categories: teaching effectiveness, student grading practices, teacher characteristics, and the format of evaluation forms.
Although we don't know for certain the impact of Roger's poor performance on his colleagues, the practice of hiring an under-qualified person solely because of his or her special status is a surefire way of nurturing previously held biases about the capabilities of particular groups.
3)] as a systematic laboratory-effects model to distinguish it from the random laboratory-effects model (2) that regards the biases (systematic errors) [b.
The questions are geared to poke holes in our assumptions, biases and all-round ignorance of the animal world.
Of the incidents, racial bias motivated 4,295; religious bias was associated with 1,411; sexual-orientation bias accounted for 1,317; ethnicity/national origin bias was the cause of 829; disability bias was connected with 19; and the remaining 5 incidents resulted from multiple biases.
SANTA CLARITA - Despite decades of attempts by community and social workers to dispel myths and biases about sexual assault, caveman ideas still exist.
Many who read this comment will automatically presume the child speaking is a girl and project their corresponding biases onto her.
Jim Klumpner [1996] in the previous article has attacked the analysis of CPI biases presented in the Interim Report to the Senate Finance Committee [1995] from the Advisory Commission to Study the Consumer Price Index.