bias

(redirected from biased)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to biased: unbiased, Biased sample

bias

 [bi´as]
1. (in a measurement process) systematic error.
2. any influence or action at any stage of a study that systematically distorts the findings.
3. (of a statistical estimator) the difference between the expected value of the estimator and the true parameter value.

bi·as

(bī'-as),
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

There is no imputation of prejudice, partisanship, or other subjective or emotional factor such as an investigator's desire to achieve a particular outcome. More than 100 varieties of bias have been described, but all fall into a small number of classes: 1. Systematic one-sided variation of measurements from the true value. SYN systematic error, instrumental error 2. Variation of statistical summary measures (means, rates, measures of association) from their true values as a result of systematic variation of measurements, other flaws in data collection, or flaws in study design or analysis. 3. Deviation of inferences from the truth as a result of flaws in study design, data collection, or the analysis or interpretation of results. 4. A tendency of procedures in study design, data collection, analysis, interpretation, review or publication, to yield results or conclusions that depart from the truth. 5. Prejudice leading to the conscious or subconscious selection of study procedures that depart from the truth in a particular direction, or to one-sidedness in interpretation of results. This last form of bias can arise as a result of shoddy scientific methods or deliberate misrepresentation of the truth by investigators.

bias

[bī′əs]
Etymology: MFr, biais
1 an oblique or a diagonal line.
2 a prejudiced or subjective attitude.
3 (in statistics) the distortion of statistical findings from the true value. There can be many kinds of bias; some may be caused by the sampling process, but bias can be caused by other factors.
4 (in electronics) a voltage applied to an electronic device, such as a vacuum tube or a transistor, to control operating limits. See also detection bias.

bias

Epidemiology Deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such systematic deviation; any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that are systematically incorrect

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review, which can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

bias,

n in statistics, the systematic distortion of a statistic caused by a particular sampling process.

bias

any systematic error in the design, conduct or analysis of a study which results in estimates which depart from true values. An unbiased study is free from systematic error. Many types of bias have been named, but three general types can be identified, selection bias, information bias and confounding. Selection bias is a systematic error in a study caused by the individuals selected into the study being different from the entire target population in an important way. See also berkson's bias. Information bias is a systematic error in a study caused by errors in the data which are collected in the study, or in the analysis of the data.
References in periodicals archive ?
Are media outlets really biased against Republican candidates?
Therefore, one way of determining whether a news outlet is biased or not is to examine the amount of fairness and balance in its coverage.
Spot quickly that a forecast is biased--it is little use establishing that it was biased after the period concerned has ended.
Using an autorouter in these conditions makes sense; however, autorouters are biased and NSEW escapes are not compatible with layer-biased autorouting.
Murdock, who represents local resident and airport opponent Justine Turner, claimed Rew was ``openly hostile and biased against air park opponents'' during commission hearings.
Physicians are not immune from biased thinking any more than they are immune to disease.
Although Cashin (1995) believes that students' ratings of faculty, generally speaking, are reliable and relatively free from bias, McKeachie (1997) opposes them and suggests that students' ratings can be biased by variables other than teaching effectiveness.
Jon Stewart of "The Daily Show" agrees with Sinclair Broadcasting that the reading of the names of approximately 700 Americans who have died in Iraq on ABC's "Nightline" was biased against the administration of President George W.
Did the offender use biased oral comments, written statements, or gestures?
Understanding that the news media is biased is important, of course.
For all the technologically produced and overdetermined media constructions of knowledge that are spatially biased (represented especially by the television documentary Tom is ordered to make), Stations argues for a balance with the temporal by both insinuating and insisting upon oral forms of expression.