betatron


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

be·ta·tron

(bā'tă-tron),
A circular electron accelerator that is a source of either high energy electrons or x-rays.

betatron

[bā′tətron]
a cyclic accelerator that produces high-energy electrons for radiotherapy. The magnetic field of the betatron deflects electrons into a circular orbit, and an increasing magnetic orbital flux produces an induced circumferential electric field that accelerates them.

betatron

A cyclotron which accelerates electrons via a pulsating magnetic field, imparting up to 20 MeV of energy. The first medical betatron was opened in the 1950s, but was limited by the low attainable strength of the magnetic field and the size of the magnetic core.

be·ta·tron

(bā'tă-tron)
A circular electron accelerator that is a source of either high energy electrons or x-rays.

be·ta·tron

(bā'tă-tron)
A circular electron accelerator that is a source of either high energy electrons or x-rays.

betatron (bā´tətron),

n a machine that produces high-speed electrons through magnetic induction.

betatron

an apparatus for accelerating electrons to millions of electron volts by magnetic induction.
References in periodicals archive ?
2] is responsible for linear betatron motion and chromaticity, while the remainder describes higher order contributions.
2005) Observation of vertical betatron sideband due to elctron clouds in the KEKB low energy ring.
But while he admits that he "enjoyed a challenging satisfying profession" dealing with mesotrons cyclotrons betatrons "the giant dipole resonance" and the ever elusive gamma rays he also cautions his readers that some parts of his book "may occasionally even require some advanced [scientific] knowledge to appreciate [them] fully.
What we call in general semantics a scientific orientation is not, therefore, test tubes, or logarithmic tables, or betatrons, or other paraphernalia of science; it is not even an attitude of cold, calculating detachment, as is popularly believed.
Newspapers, magazines, news services and radio broadcasters were soon ordered not to mention atomic power, cyclotrons, betatrons, fission, uranium, deuterium, protoactinium and thorium.